Welcome!

Blog Feed Post

Common OAuth Security Mistakes & Threat Mitigations

Screen Shot 2013-09-26 at 3.17.17 PMI just found out we had record attendance for Wednesday’s API Tech Talk. Clearly, there’s an appetite for the topic of OAuth risk mitigation.

With our digital lives scattered across so many services, there is great value in technology that lets us control how these service providers interact on our behalf. For providers, making sure this happens in a secure way is critical. Recent hacks associated with improperly-secured OAuth implementations show that OAuth-related security risks need be taken seriously.

When in doubt, take a second look at the security considerations of the spec. There is also useful information in RFC6819 – OAuth 2.0 Treat Model & Security Considerations.

The Obvious Stuff

Let’s get a few obvious things out of the way:

  1. Use SSL (HTTPS)
  2. Shared secrets are confidential (if you can’t hide it, it doesn’t count as a secret)
  3. Sanitize all inputs
  4. Limit session lifespan
  5. Limit scope associated with sessions

None of these are specific to OAuth. They apply to just about any scheme involving sessions and secrets. For example, form login and cookie-based sessions in Web applications.

OAuth’s Main Attack Vector

Some of the grant types defined by the OAuth protocol involve the end-user being redirected from an application to a service provider’s authorization server where the user is authenticated and expresses consent for the application to call the service provider’s API on its behalf. Once this is done, the user is redirected back to the client application at a callback address provided by the client application at the beginning of the handshake. In the implicit grant type, the redirection back to the application includes the resulting access token issued by the OAuth provider.

OAuth’s main attack vector involves a malicious application pretending to be a legitimate application. When such an attacker attaches its own address as the callback for the authorization server, the user is redirected back to the malicious application instead of the legitimate one. As a result, the malicious application is now in possession of the token that was intended for a legitimate application. This attacking application can now call the API on behalf of the user and wreak havoc.

OAuth 101: Callback Address Validation

The most obvious defense against this type of attack is for the service provider to require that legitimate client applications register their callback addresses. This registration step is essential as it forms the basis of a user being able to assess which application it is granting to act on its behalf. At runtime, the OAuth authorization server compares these registered values against the callback address provided at the beginning of the handshake (redirect_uri parameter). Under no circumstance should an OAuth authorization server ever redirect a user (along with an access token) to an unregistered callback address. The enforcement of these values is a fundamental precaution that should be engrained in any OAuth implementation. Any loophole exploiting a failure to implement such a validation is simply inexcusable.

redirect_uri.startsWith(registered_value) => Not good enough!
Some application developers append client-side state at the end of runtime redirection addresses. To accommodate this, an OAuth provider may be tempted to merely validate that a runtime redirection address starts with the registered value. This is not good enough. An attacker may exploit this by adding a suffix to a redirection address – for example, to point to another domain name. Strict redirection URI trumps anything else, always. See http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc6819#section-5.2.3.5.

Dealing with Public (Not Confidential) Clients

If you are using the authorization code grant type instead of implicit, a phishing attack yields an authorization code, not the actual access token. Although this is technically more secure, the authorization code is information that could be combined with another vulnerability to be exploited – specifically, another vulnerability caused by improperly securing a shared secret needed to complete the code handshake in the first place.

The difference between the implicit and authorization code grant types is that one deals with public clients and the other deals with confidential ones. Some may be tempted to rely on authorization code rather than implicit in order to add security to their handshakes. If you expose APIs that are meant to be consumed by public clients (such as a mobile app or a JavaScript-based invocation), forcing the application developer to use a shared secret will only lead to these shared secrets being compromised because they cannot be effectively kept confidential on a public platform. It is better to be prepared to deal with public clients and provide handshake patterns that make them secure, rather than obfuscate secrets into public apps and cross your fingers they don’t end up being reverse-engineered.

Remembering Past Consent Increases Risk

Imagine a handshake where a user is redirected to an authorization server (e.g. implicit grant). Imagine this handshake happening for the second or third time. Because the user has an existing session with the service provider, with which the authorization server is associated (via a cookie), the authentication step is not required and is skipped. Some authorization server implementations also choose to “remember” the initial expression of consent and will not prompt the user to express consent again – all in the name of better user experience. The result is that the user is immediately redirected back to the client application without interaction. This typically happens quickly and the user is not even aware that a handshake has just happened.

An “invisible” handshake of this kind may lead to improved user experience in some situations but this also increases the effectiveness of a phishing attack. If the authorization server does not choose to implement this kind of handshake and instead prompts the user to express consent again, the user is now aware that a handshake is at play. Because the user does not expect this action, this “pause” provides an opportunity for the user to question the action which led to this prompt in the first place and helps the user in recognizing that something “phishy” is in progress.

Although bypassing the authentication step provides an improvement in user experience, bypassing consent and allowing redirection handshakes without displaying anything that allows a user to abort the handshake is dangerous and the resulting UX gain is minimal (just skipping an “OK” button).


Read the original blog entry...

More Stories By Francois Lascelles

As Layer 7’s Chief Architect, Francois Lascelles guides the solutions architecture team and aligns product evolution with field trends. Francois joined Layer 7 in the company’s infancy – contributing as the first developer and designing the foundation of Layer 7’s Gateway technology. Now in a field-facing role, Francois helps enterprise architects apply the latest standards and patterns. Francois is a regular blogger and speaker and is also co-author of Service-Oriented Infrastructure: On-Premise and in the Cloud, published by Prentice Hall. Francois holds a Bachelor of Engineering degree from Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal and a black belt in OAuth. Follow Francois on Twitter: @flascelles

Latest Stories
"We do one of the best file systems in the world. We learned how to deal with Big Data many years ago and we implemented this knowledge into our software," explained Jakub Ratajczak, Business Development Manager at MooseFS, in this SYS-CON.tv interview at 20th Cloud Expo, held June 6-8, 2017, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY.
Five years ago development was seen as a dead-end career, now it’s anything but – with an explosion in mobile and IoT initiatives increasing the demand for skilled engineers. But apart from having a ready supply of great coders, what constitutes true ‘DevOps Royalty’? It’ll be the ability to craft resilient architectures, supportability, security everywhere across the software lifecycle. In his keynote at @DevOpsSummit at 20th Cloud Expo, Jeffrey Scheaffer, GM and SVP, Continuous Delivery Busine...
In his session at @ThingsExpo, Eric Lachapelle, CEO of the Professional Evaluation and Certification Board (PECB), provided an overview of various initiatives to certify the security of connected devices and future trends in ensuring public trust of IoT. Eric Lachapelle is the Chief Executive Officer of the Professional Evaluation and Certification Board (PECB), an international certification body. His role is to help companies and individuals to achieve professional, accredited and worldwide re...
SYS-CON Events announced today that TechTarget has been named “Media Sponsor” of SYS-CON's 21st International Cloud Expo, which will take place on Oct 31 – Nov 2, 2017, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. TechTarget storage websites are the best online information resource for news, tips and expert advice for the storage, backup and disaster recovery markets.
The current age of digital transformation means that IT organizations must adapt their toolset to cover all digital experiences, beyond just the end users’. Today’s businesses can no longer focus solely on the digital interactions they manage with employees or customers; they must now contend with non-traditional factors. Whether it's the power of brand to make or break a company, the need to monitor across all locations 24/7, or the ability to proactively resolve issues, companies must adapt to...
You know you need the cloud, but you’re hesitant to simply dump everything at Amazon since you know that not all workloads are suitable for cloud. You know that you want the kind of ease of use and scalability that you get with public cloud, but your applications are architected in a way that makes the public cloud a non-starter. You’re looking at private cloud solutions based on hyperconverged infrastructure, but you’re concerned with the limits inherent in those technologies.
"Loom is applying artificial intelligence and machine learning into the entire log analysis process, from start to finish and at the end you will get a human touch,” explained Sabo Taylor Diab, Vice President, Marketing at Loom Systems, in this SYS-CON.tv interview at 20th Cloud Expo, held June 6-8, 2017, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY.
@DevOpsSummit at Cloud Expo taking place Oct 31 - Nov 2, 2017, at the Santa Clara Convention Center, Santa Clara, CA, is co-located with the 21st International Cloud Expo and will feature technical sessions from a rock star conference faculty and the leading industry players in the world. The widespread success of cloud computing is driving the DevOps revolution in enterprise IT. Now as never before, development teams must communicate and collaborate in a dynamic, 24/7/365 environment. There is ...
SYS-CON Events announced today that Datanami has been named “Media Sponsor” of SYS-CON's 21st International Cloud Expo, which will take place on Oct 31 – Nov 2, 2017, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. Datanami is a communication channel dedicated to providing insight, analysis and up-to-the-minute information about emerging trends and solutions in Big Data. The publication sheds light on all cutting-edge technologies including networking, storage and applications, and the...
After more than five years of DevOps, definitions are evolving, boundaries are expanding, ‘unicorns’ are no longer rare, enterprises are on board, and pundits are moving on. Can we now look at an evolution of DevOps? Should we? Is the foundation of DevOps ‘done’, or is there still too much left to do? What is mature, and what is still missing? What does the next 5 years of DevOps look like? In this Power Panel at DevOps Summit, moderated by DevOps Summit Conference Chair Andi Mann, panelists loo...
SYS-CON Events announced today that EnterpriseTech has been named “Media Sponsor” of SYS-CON's 21st International Cloud Expo, which will take place on Oct 31 – Nov 2, 2017, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. EnterpriseTech is a professional resource for news and intelligence covering the migration of high-end technologies into the enterprise and business-IT industry, with a special focus on high-tech solutions in new product development, workload management, increased effi...
For organizations that have amassed large sums of software complexity, taking a microservices approach is the first step toward DevOps and continuous improvement / development. Integrating system-level analysis with microservices makes it easier to change and add functionality to applications at any time without the increase of risk. Before you start big transformation projects or a cloud migration, make sure these changes won’t take down your entire organization.
Cloud promises the agility required by today’s digital businesses. As organizations adopt cloud based infrastructures and services, their IT resources become increasingly dynamic and hybrid in nature. Managing these require modern IT operations and tools. In his session at 20th Cloud Expo, Raj Sundaram, Senior Principal Product Manager at CA Technologies, will discuss how to modernize your IT operations in order to proactively manage your hybrid cloud and IT environments. He will be sharing bes...
A look across the tech landscape at the disruptive technologies that are increasing in prominence and speculate as to which will be most impactful for communications – namely, AI and Cloud Computing. In his session at 20th Cloud Expo, Curtis Peterson, VP of Operations at RingCentral, highlighted the current challenges of these transformative technologies and shared strategies for preparing your organization for these changes. This “view from the top” outlined the latest trends and developments i...
Automation is enabling enterprises to design, deploy, and manage more complex, hybrid cloud environments. Yet the people who manage these environments must be trained in and understanding these environments better than ever before. A new era of analytics and cognitive computing is adding intelligence, but also more complexity, to these cloud environments. How smart is your cloud? How smart should it be? In this power panel at 20th Cloud Expo, moderated by Conference Chair Roger Strukhoff, paneli...