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Local Optometrist Assumes Ownership Of Brookfield, WI Pearle Vision Neighborhood Eye Care Center

MASON, Ohio, Feb. 17, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Pearle Vision, one of North America's largest and most trusted licensed optical brands, has signed an agreement with Vincent Facchiano, O.D., F.A.A.O., and his junior partner, Joshua Heinecke, O.D., to assume ownership of the Pearle Vision center in Brookfield, Wis. The former corporate-owned center is located at 17550-D W. Blue Mound Road in the Brownstone Shopping Center.

Pearle Vision Logo.

A veteran in the business of eye care, Dr. Facchiano owns and operates another Pearle Vision in the Madison suburb of Fitchburg, Wis. with junior partner Jeremy Goetsch, O.D. He has been recognized in the community and won numerous awards, including a Hixon Fellowship from Kiwanis, which was awarded for outstanding support and service. A lifelong resident of nearby Belvidere, Ill., Dr. Facchiano is president of the Northern Illinois Optometric Society.

"It is my mission and commitment to both of my business partners that our Pearle Vision locations provide the best possible eye care to the people of Brookfield and Fitchburg," said Dr. Facchiano. "Additionally, I will continue to leverage my diverse optical and business experience to provide a full scope of primary eye care services and provide exceptional care, as well as give back to the community whenever possible. I believe the future is bright with Pearle Vision."

Active in community groups, including Kiwanis, the Special Olympics and Habitat for Humanity, Facchiano is a past president of the Belvidere Lions and has served on over 20 mission trips. Working with VOSH, Gift of Sight and OneSight organizations, he served on a recent mission to a Native American reservation in Eagle Butte. He is also active with the Rockford Rescue Mission, the Serve with Mountain Top Ministry in Haiti, and the Lifeline Pilots and Angel Flight. An avid pilot, Dr. Facchiano "commutes" to his Wisconsin Pearle Vision locations by air.

Pearle Vision has a significant legacy in the industry, providing genuine eye care to patients through a doctor-centric business model. The franchise has continued to outpace competitors by evolving to meet patients' changing needs and providing quality products and services they desire. With more than 610 centers located throughout North America, the company offers best-in-class eye care provided by neighborhood doctors who are skilled optometrists, a principle created by Dr. Stanley Pearle in 1961.

Pearle Vision is now seeking to grow its national footprint and has identified development opportunities in markets from coast-to-coast. In addition to new territories available for development, corporate-owned locations in markets such as Illinois, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Michigan, Florida and Washington also are available and have thriving operations with strong customer-bases.

To fuel its growth, the company is looking for optometrists interested in licensing opportunities. Ideal candidates for Pearle Vision ownership should possess a desire to join a trusted industry-leading brand and work within a proven system to provide exceptional eye care and superior patient service. Pearle Vision licensees can expect their initial investment to build a new center to cost approximately $200,000, in addition to a licensing fee of $30,000.

Optometrists interested in exploring re-licensing or new development opportunities should call 1.800.PEARLE.1 or visit www.ownapearlevision.com.

About Pearle Vision
Pearle Vision was founded in 1961 by Dr. Stanley Pearle, who began the concept of one-stop, total eye care with the opening of the Pearle Vision Center in Savannah, Ga. Pearle combined complete eye exams with an extensive selection of eyewear. In 1981, Pearle Vision began offering licenses to select doctors and opticians. Today, with more than 610 eye care centers located throughout the United States, Pearle Vision is built around a doctor-centered business model with a primary focus to deliver genuine eye care to patients and become a trusted source for all their eye health needs. Pearle Vision is owned by Luxottica, a leader in premium fashion, luxury and sports eyewear. For more information, visit http://www.PearleVision.com.

Luxottica Group S.p.A.
Luxottica Group is a leader in premium, luxury and sports eyewear with approximately 7,000 optical and sun retail stores in North America, Asia-Pacific, China, South Africa, Latin America and Europe, and a strong, well-balanced brand portfolio. House brands include Ray-Ban, the world's most famous sun eyewear brand, Oakley, Vogue Eyewear, Persol, Oliver Peoples, Alain Mikli, Arnette and REVO, while licensed brands include Giorgio Armani, Bulgari, Burberry, Chanel, Coach, Dolce & Gabbana, Donna Karan, Polo Ralph Lauren, Prada, Starck Eyes, Tiffany and Versace. In addition to a global wholesale network involving 130 different countries, the Group manages leading retail chains in major markets, including LensCrafters, Pearle Vision and ILORI in North America, OPSM and Laubman & Pank in Asia-Pacific, LensCrafters in China, GMO in Latin America and Sunglass Hut worldwide. The Group's products are designed and manufactured at its six manufacturing plants in Italy, two wholly owned plants in the People's Republic of China, one plant in Brazil and one plant in the United States devoted to the production of sports eyewear. In 2012, Luxottica Group posted net sales of more than €7.0 billion. Additional information on the Group is available at www.luxottica.com

Safe Harbor Statement
Certain statements in this press release may constitute "forward looking statements" as defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Such statements involve risks, uncertainties and other factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those which are anticipated. Such risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, the ability to manage the effects of the current uncertain international economic outlook, the ability to successfully acquire and integrate new businesses, the ability to predict future economic conditions and changes to consumer preferences, the ability to successfully introduce and market new products, the ability to maintain an efficient distribution system, the ability to achieve and manage growth, the ability to negotiate and maintain favorable license agreements, the availability of correction alternatives to prescription eyeglasses, fluctuations in exchange rates, changes in local conditions, the ability to protect intellectual property, the ability to maintain relations with those hosting our stores, computer system problems, inventory-related risks, credit and insurance risks, changes to tax regimes as well as other political, economic and technological factors and other risks and uncertainties referred to in Luxottica Group's filings with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. These forward looking statements are made as of the date hereof and Luxottica Group does not assume any obligation to update them.

MEDIA CONTACTS:
Amanda DelPrete
954-893-9150
[email protected]

Emily Ryan
513-765-3358
[email protected]

Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130709/NY43871LOGO

SOURCE Pearle Vision

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