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Energy Harvesting and Storage for Electronic Devices 2014-2024: Forecasts, Technologies, Players

NEW YORK, April 3, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report is available in its catalogue:

Energy Harvesting and Storage for Electronic Devices 2014-2024: Forecasts, Technologies, Players
http://www.reportlinker.com/p02063307/Energy-Harvesting-and-Storage-for-Electronic-Devices-2014-2024-Forecasts-Technologies-Players .html#utm_source=prnewswire&utm_medium=pr&utm_campaign=Broadband

Energy harvesting is the process by which ambient energy is captured and converted into electricity for small autonomous devices, such as satellites, laptops and nodes in sensor networks making them self-sufficient. Although energy harvesting applications reach from vehicles to the smart grid, the majority of the value this year is in consumer electronic applications, where energy harvesters have been used for some time.

Energy harvesting, otherwise known as power harvesting or energy scavenging includes photovoltaics, thermovoltaics, piezoelectrics and electrodynamics, among other options, which are now being used in a wide variety of applications. The technology has reached a tipping point, because the necessary lower power electronics and more efficient energy gathering and storage are now sufficiently affordable, reliable and longer lived for a huge number of applications to be practicable.

From wind-up laptops for Africa, wireless light switches working from the power of your finger and wireless sensors in oil fields monitoring equipment power by vibration - these are all in use now with many more applications emerging.

Market segments using Energy Harvesting

This report covers the following market segments with detailed ten year forecasts of each:

- Wristwatches
- Bicycle dynamo
- Laptops, e-books
- Mobile phones
- Other portable consumer electronics - Calculators, toys, piezo gas lighters, electronic car keys, electronic apparel etc
- Wireless sensor mesh networks
- Other Industrial -Mainly buildings, machinery, engines, non-meshed wireless sensors and actuators
- Military and aerospace excluding WSN
- Healthcare - Implants, disposable testers and drug delivery etc
- Other - Research, animals, farming etc

Energy harvesting by technology type

This year, most of the harvesters used in the above market segments are solar cells followed by electrodynamos, two relatively mature energy harvesting technologies. However, many new technologies are now taking some market share enabling power in areas not possible before. This includes thermoelectrics - generating power from heat - where organisations such as the Department of Energy in the US are working with BMW and GM to turn heat waste from engines and exhaust into power for the vehicle's electrical systems. NASA use thermoelectrics to power Mars rovers where they work without light, unlike solar cells. Piezoelectric energy harvesters are also of great interest due to their small form factor and high efficiency. In 2022, these four energy harvester types will have near similar market share for industrial sensing applications. However, even by then solar will continue to dominate for consumer applications.

For the first time, this unique report looks at the global situation. It covers the progress of more than 350 organizations in 22 countries and gives detailed case studies. Market forecasts are provided for everything from self-sufficient wristwatches to mobile phones that will never need a charger and light switches and controls that have no wiring and no batteries when fitted in buildings to wireless sensors power from the environment they are placed in.

However, there are further mountains to climb in order to achieve self-powered wireless sensors monitoring forest fires, pollution spillages and even inside the human body and in the concrete of buildings. These applications will become commonplace one day. Even devices with maintenance-free life of hundreds of years can now be envisaged. Meanwhile, bionic man containing maintenance free, self-powered devices for his lifetime is an objective for the next few years. IDTechEx find that the total market for energy harvesting devices, including everything from wristwatches to wireless sensors will rise to over $2.6 billion in 2024.

How do these things work? Which technologies have the most potential now and in the future? What are the advantages and disadvantages of each? Which countries have the most active programs and why? What are the leading universities, developers, manufacturers and other players up to? What alliances exist? What are the timelines for success? All these questions and more are answered in this report.
1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS
1.1. Market forecast 2014-2024
1.2. Technology sector forecasts for Energy Harvesting 2014-2024
1.3. Regenerative braking
2. INTRODUCTION
2.1. What is energy harvesting?
2.2. What it is not
2.3. Energy harvesting compared with alternatives

2.4. Power requirements of different devices
3. ENERGY HARVESTING TECHNOLOGIES AND THEIR APPLICATIONS
3.1. Thermoelectric energy harvesting
3.1.1. Technology and scientific principles
3.1.2. Designing for thermoelectric applications
3.1.3. Thin Film Thermoelectric Generators
3.1.4. Material choices
3.2. Applications
3.2.1. Automotive Applications
3.3. Wireless Sensing
3.3.1. TE-CORE
3.3.2. WiTemp
3.4. Other industrial applications
3.5. Aerospace
3.6. Wearable thermoelectrics
3.7. Consumer applications
3.7.2. PowerPot™
4. PIEZOELECTRIC ENERGY HARVESTING
4.1. Technology and scientific principles
4.1.1. What is piezoelectric energy harvesting?
4.1.2. How piezoelectricity works

4.1.3. How piezoelectric materials are made
4.1.4. PZT - leading piezoelectric material used today
4.1.5. Single Crystal Piezo
4.1.6. Piezo Fibre Composites PFCs and IDEPFC
4.2. Piezoelectrics as an energy harvester
4.3. Vibration harvesting
4.3.1. Wideband
4.3.2. Damping
4.3.3. Remote controllers
4.4. Movement harvesting options
4.5. Applications
4.5.1. Consumer Electronics
4.5.2. Energy harvesting for Vehicles
4.5.3. Application Case Study: Piezo Power Source for tyre pressure monitoring
4.5.4. Healthcare
4.5.5. Powering Wireless Sensors
4.5.6. Switching and Lighting: Piezoelectric Energy harvesting
5. SOLAR ENERGY HARVESTING
5.1. Technologies and scientific principles
5.1.1. Organic PV
5.2. Efficiency

5.2.1. Ways to improve the efficiency
5.3. DSSC (dye sensitized solar cells)
5.3.2. Solid State DSSCs
5.3.3. Applications
6. ELECTRODYNAMIC ENERGY HARVESTING
6.1. Technology and scientific principles
6.1.1. Applications
7. PROFILES OF PARTICIPANTS IN 22 COUNTRIES
7.1. 3G Solar
7.2. Advanced Cerametrics
7.3. Agency for Defense Development
7.4. AIST Tsukuba
7.5. Algra
7.6. Ambient Research
7.7. AmbioSystems LLC
7.8. Amerigon-BSST
7.9. Applied Digital Solutions
7.10. Arveni
7.11. Australian National University - Department of Engineering
7.12. Boeing

7.13. California Institute of Technology/Jet Propulsion Laboratory
7.14. Cambrian Innovation (formerly IntAct)
7.15. Canova Tech
7.16. Carnegie Mellon University
7.17. Chinese University of Hong Kong
7.18. CSIRO
7.19. Cymtox Ltd
7.20. DisaSolar
7.21. Drexel University
7.22. Dyesol
7.23. East Japan Railway Company
7.24. EDF R&D
7.25. Eight19
7.26. Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI)

7.27. Ember Corporation
7.28. Encrea srl
7.29. European Space Agency
7.30. EVERREDtronics
7.31. Fast Trak Ltd
7.32. Ferro Solutions, Inc.
7.33. Ferrotec
7.34. Fraunhofer IKTS
7.35. Fraunhofer Institut Integrierte Schaltungen
7.36. Freeplay Foundation
7.37. Fujikura
7.38. G24i Power
7.39. Ganssle Group
7.40. Gas Sensing Solution Ltd
7.41. General Electric Company
7.42. Georgia Institute of Technology
7.43. Global Thermoelectric
7.44. GreenPeak Technologies
7.45. greenTEG
7.46. Harvard University
7.47. Heliatek GmbH

7.48. Henkel
7.49. Hi-Tech Wealth
7.50. Holst Centre
7.51. Honeywell
7.52. Idaho National Laboratory
7.53. IMEC
7.54. Imperial College
7.55. Imperial College London
7.56. India Space Research Organisation
7.57. Intel
7.58. ITRI (Industrial Technology Research Institute)
7.59. ITT
7.60. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency
7.61. JX Nippon Oil and Gas

7.62. Kanazawa University
7.63. KCF Technologies Inc
7.64. Kinergi Pty Ltd
7.65. Kinetron BV
7.66. Konarka
7.67. Kookmin University,
7.68. Korea Electronics Company
7.69. Korea Institute of Science and Technology and Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology
7.70. Laird / Nextreme
7.71. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
7.72. Lear Corporation
7.73. Lebônê Solutions
7.74. Lockheed Martin Corporation
7.75. LV Sensors, Inc.
7.76. Marlow
7.77. Massachusetts Institute of Technology
7.78. mc10
7.79. Meggitt Sensing Systems
7.80. Michigan Technological University

7.81. Microdul AG
7.82. Microgen
7.83. Micropelt GmbH
7.84. Microsemi
7.85. MicroStrain Inc.
7.86. Midé Technology Corporation
7.87. Mitsubishi Corporation
7.88. Nanosonic Inc
7.89. NASA
7.90. National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science & Technology (AIST)
7.91. National Renewable Energy Lab (USA)
7.92. National Semiconductor
7.93. Nextreme
7.94. Nissha Printing
7.95. NNL - Universita del Salento
7.96. Nokia Cambridge UK Research Centre
7.97. North Carolina State University
7.98. Northeastern University
7.99. Northwestern University
7.100. Nova Mems
7.101. NTT DOCOMO
7.102. Oak Ridge National Laboratory
7.103. Ohio State University

7.104. Omron Corporation
7.105. Oxford Photovoltaics
7.106. Pavegen
7.107. Perpetua
7.108. Perpetuum Ltd
7.109. Plextronics
7.110. Polatis Photonics
7.111. PowerFilm, Inc.
7.112. POWERLeap
7.113. PulseSwitch Systems
7.114. Rockwell Scientific
7.115. Romny Scientific
7.116. Rosemount, Inc.
7.117. Samsung SDI
7.118. Sandia National Laboratory
7.119. Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna
7.120. Seiko
7.121. Shanghai Jiao Tong University
7.122. SHARP
7.123. Siemens Power Generation
7.124. Simon Fraser University

7.125. Smart Material Corp.
7.126. SMH
7.127. Solarmer
7.128. Solaronix
7.129. SolarPress
7.130. SolarPrint
7.131. Solid State Research inc
7.132. Sony
7.133. SONY Technology Centre
7.134. Southampton University Hospital
7.135. SPAWAR
7.136. Spectrolab Inc
7.137. Syngenta Sensors UIC
7.138. Technical University of Denmark
7.139. Tellurex
7.140. Texas Micropower
7.141. The Technology Partnership
7.142. Thermolife Energy Corporation
7.143. TiSol
7.144. Tokyo Institute of Technology
7.145. Trophos Energy
7.146. TRW Conekt
7.147. TU ILmenau, Fachgebiet Experimantalphysik I
7.148. Tyndall National Institute
7.149. University of Bristol
7.150. University of California Berkeley
7.151. University of California Los Angeles
7.152. University of Edinburgh
7.153. University of Erlangen

7.154. University of Florida
7.155. University of Freiburg - IMTEK
7.156. University of Idaho
7.157. University of Manchester
7.158. University of Michigan
7.159. University of Pittsburgh
7.160. University of Princeton
7.161. University of Southampton
7.162. University of Surrey (UK)
7.163. University of Tokyo
7.164. Uppsala University
7.165. US Army Research Laboratory
7.166. Virginia Tech
7.167. Voltaic Systems Inc
7.168. Wireless Industrial Technologies
7.169. ZMD AG
8. THE ENOCEAN ALLIANCE
8.1. Promoters
8.1.1. BSC Computer GmbH - Germany
8.1.2. EnOcean -Germany
8.1.3. Leviton - United States
8.1.4. Masco - United States
8.1.5. MK Electric (a Honeywell Business) - United Kingdom
8.1.6. Omnio - Switzerland
8.1.7. OPUS greenNet - Germany
8.1.8. Texas Instruments - United States
8.1.9. Thermokon Sensortechnik - Germany
8.2. Participants

8.2.1. ACTE .PL
8.2.2. Ad Hoc Electronics - United States
8.2.3. Atlas Group
8.2.4. b.a.b technologie GmbH - Germany
8.2.5. Beckhoff - Germany
8.2.6. bk-electronic GmbH
8.2.7. BootUp GmbH - Switzerland
8.2.8. BSC Computer GmbH
8.2.9. Cozir - United Kindom
8.2.10. Denro - Germany
8.2.11. Distech Controls - Canada
8.2.12. DRSG
8.2.13. EchoFlex Solutions
8.2.14. EHRT
8.2.15. Elsner Elektronik - Germany
8.2.16. Eltako GmbH
8.2.17. Emerge Alliance
8.2.18. Ex-Or - United Kindom
8.2.19. Funk Technik - Germany
8.2.20. GE Energy - United States
8.2.21. GFR - Germany
8.2.22. Hansgrohe Group - Germany
8.2.23. Hautau - Germany
8.2.24. HESCH - Germany
8.2.25. Hoppe - Germany
8.2.26. Hotel Technology Next Generation - United States
8.2.27. IK Elektronik GmbH - Germany
8.2.28. ILLUMRA - United States

8.2.29. INSYS Electronics
8.2.30. Intesis Software SL - Spain
8.2.31. IP Controls - Germany
8.2.32. Jager Direkt GmbH & Co
8.2.33. Kieback&Peter GmbH & Co. KG - Germany
8.2.34. LonMark International
8.2.35. Lutuo - China
8.2.36. Magnum Energy Solutions LLC - United States
8.2.37. Murata Europe - Germany
8.2.38. Osram
8.2.39. Osram Silvania
8.2.40. OVERKIZ - Germany
8.2.41. PEHA
8.2.42. PEHA - Germany
8.2.43. PROBARE
8.2.44. Regulvar
8.2.45. Reliable Controls - Canada
8.2.46. S+S Regeltechnik
8.2.47. S4 Group - United States
8.2.48. Sauter
8.2.49. Schulte Elektrotechnik GmbH & Co. KG
8.2.50. SCL Elements Inc - Canada
8.2.51. SensorDynamics AG
8.2.52. Servodan A/S
8.2.53. Shaspa - United Kingdom
8.2.54. Siemens Building Technologies - Switzerland
8.2.55. Siemens Building Technologies GmbH & Co
8.2.56. SmartHome Initiative - Germany

8.2.57. SOMMER - Germany
8.2.58. Spartan Peripheral Devices - Canada
8.2.59. Spega - Germany
8.2.60. steute Schaltgeräte GmbH & Co. KG
8.2.61. Texas Instruments
8.2.62. Titus - United States
8.2.63. Unitronic AG Zentrale - Germany
8.2.64. Unotech A/S - Denmark
8.2.65. USNAP - United States
8.2.66. Vicos - Austria
8.2.67. Viessmann Group - Germany
8.2.68. Vossloh-Schwabe - Germany
8.2.69. WAGO Kontakttechnik GmbH & Co. KG - Germany
8.2.70. Wieland Electric GmbH - Germany
8.2.71. YTL Technologies - China
8.2.72. Zumtobel Lighting GmbH - Austria
8.3. Associates
8.3.1. A. & H. MEYER GmbH - Germany
8.3.2. ABC Shop 24 - Germany
8.3.3. Active Business Company GmbH
8.3.4. Akktor GmbH - Germany
8.3.5. Alvi Technologies
8.3.6. ASP Automação - Brazil
8.3.7. Axis Lighting - Canada
8.3.8. Biberach University of Applied Sciences
8.3.9. bmd AG -Switzerland
8.3.10. BMS Systems
8.3.11. Building Intelligence Group LLC - United States

8.3.12. CAO Group, Inc. - United States
8.3.13. Circuit Holding - Egypt
8.3.14. Com-Pacte - France
8.3.15. Cymbet - United States
8.3.16. Dauphin - Germany
8.3.17. DigiTower Cologne
8.3.18. DimOnOff - Canada
8.3.19. Distech Controls
8.3.20. Dogma Living Technology - Greece
8.3.21. Elektro-Systeme Matthias Friedl - Germany
8.3.22. Elka Hugo Krischke GmbH - Germany
8.3.23. Encelium Technologies - United States
8.3.24. Energie Agentur
8.3.25. enexoma AG - Germany
8.3.26. Engenuity Systems
8.3.27. Engenuity Systems - United States
8.3.28. Engineered Tax Services - United States
8.3.29. EnOcean GmbH
8.3.30. Enolzu - Spain
8.3.31. Enotech - Denmark
8.3.32. ESIC Technology & Sourcing Co., Ltd.
8.3.33. Functional Devices Inc. - United States

8.3.34. Gesteknik
8.3.35. Green Link Alliance
8.3.36. Gruppo Giordano - Italian
8.3.37. Hagemeyer - Germany
8.3.38. HBC Hochschule Biberach - Germany
8.3.39. Herbert Waldmann GmbH & Co. KG - Germany
8.3.40. Hermos - Germany
8.3.41. HK Instruments - Finland
8.3.42. Hochschule Luzern - Technik & Architektur - Switzerland
8.3.43. I.M. tecnics - Spain
8.3.44. Indie Energy - United States
8.3.45. Infinite Power Solutions, Inc. - United States
8.3.46. Ingenieurbüro Knab GmbH - Germany
8.3.47. Ingenieurbüro Zink GmbH
8.3.48. Ingenieurbüro Zink GmbH - Germany
8.3.49. INGLAS Innovative Glassysteme GmbH & Co. KG
8.3.50. Interior Automation - United Kingdom
8.3.51. Ivory Egg - United Kingdom
8.3.52. Kaga Electronics - Japan
8.3.53. KIB Projekt GmbH
8.3.54. Korea Electronics Technology Institute (KETI) - Korea

8.3.55. KVL Comp Ltd.
8.3.56. Ledalite - Canada
8.3.57. LessWire, LLC
8.3.58. Lighting Control & Design - United States
8.3.59. LogiCO2 International SARL. - Luxembourg
8.3.60. Masco
8.3.61. Mitsubishi Materials Corporation - United States
8.3.62. MK Electric (a Honeywell Business)
8.3.63. MONDIAL Electronic GmbH - Austria
8.3.64. Moritani - Japan
8.3.65. Moritani and Co Ltd
8.3.66. MW-Elektroanlagen - Germany
8.3.67. myDATA - Germany
8.3.68. Nibblewave - France
8.3.69. OBERMEYER Planen + Beraten GmbH - Germany
8.3.70. Omnio
8.3.71. Orkit Building Intelligence
8.3.72. Pohlmann Funkbussystems - Germany
8.3.73. PressFinish GmbH - Germany
8.3.74. Prulite Ltd - United States
8.3.75. Pyrecap - France
8.3.76. PYRECAP/HYCOSYS
8.3.77. R+S Group - Germany
8.3.78. SANYO Semiconductor LLC. - United States
8.3.79. SAT Herbert GmbH
8.3.80. SAT System- und Anlagentechnik Herbert GmbH
8.3.81. Seamless Sensing - United Kingdom
8.3.82. Selmoni - Switzerland

8.3.83. Sensocasa - Germany
8.3.84. Seven Line Control Systems - France
8.3.85. SIFRI, S.L. - Spain
8.3.86. SmartLiving Asia - Hong Kong
8.3.87. Spittler Lichttechnik GmbH - Germany
8.3.88. Spoon2 International Limited - United Kingdom
8.3.89. Steinbeis Transferzentrum für Embedded Design und Networking
8.3.90. StyliQ - Germany
8.3.91. STZEDN - Germany
8.3.92. Suffice Group - Hong Kong
8.3.93. Tambient
8.3.94. Tambient - United States
8.3.95. Technograph Microcircuits Ltd
8.3.96. Teleprofi-Verbindet - Germany
8.3.97. Thermokon - Danelko Elektronik AB - Sweden
8.3.98. ThermoKon Sensortechnik
8.3.99. t-mac Technologies Limited - United Kingdom
8.3.100. Tridum - United States
8.3.101. TRILUX GmbH & Co. KG - Germany

8.3.102. Unitronic AG Zentrale
8.3.103. Vicos
8.3.104. Vity Technology - Hong Kong
8.3.105. WAGO Kontakttechnik GmbH & Co. KG
8.3.106. WeberHaus - Germany
8.3.107. Web-IT - Germany
8.3.108. WelComm - United States
8.3.109. Wieland Electric GmbH
8.3.110. WIT - France
8.3.111. WM Ocean - Czech Republic
8.3.112. Yongfu - Singapore
8.3.113. Zurich University of Applied Science (ZHAW) - Switzerland
9. MARKET FORECASTS
9.1. Forecasts for energy harvesting markets
9.1.1. Addressable markets and price sensitivity
9.1.2. IDTechEx energy harvesting forecasts 2014-2024
9.2. Technology sector forecasts for energy harvesting 2014-2024
9.2.1. Timeline for widespread deployment of energy harvesting
9.2.2. Which technologies win?
9.3. Wireless Sensor Networks 2010-2022
9.4. IDTechEx forecast for 2032
9.5. Bicycle dynamo market
APPENDIX 1: IDTECHEX PUBLICATIONS AND CONSULTANCY
APPENDIX 2: WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS
APPENDIX 3: PERMANENT POWER FOR WIRELESS SENSORS - WHITE PAPER FROM CYMBET

To order this report: Energy Harvesting and Storage for Electronic Devices 2014-2024: Forecasts, Technologies, Players
http://www.reportlinker.com/p02063307/Energy-Harvesting-and-Storage-for-Electronic-Devices-2014-2024-Forecasts-Technologies-Players .html#utm_source=prnewswire&utm_medium=pr&utm_campaign=Broadband

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WebRTC services have already permeated corporate communications in the form of videoconferencing solutions. However, WebRTC has the potential of going beyond and catalyzing a new class of services providing more than calls with capabilities such as mass-scale real-time media broadcasting, enriched and augmented video, person-to-machine and machine-to-machine communications. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Luis Lopez, CEO of Kurento, will introduce the technologies required for implementing thes...
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Whether you like it or not, DevOps is on track for a remarkable alliance with security. The SEC didn’t approve the merger. And your boss hasn’t heard anything about it. Yet, this unruly triumvirate will soon dominate and deliver DevSecOps faster, cheaper, better, and on an unprecedented scale. In his session at DevOps Summit, Frank Bunger, VP of Customer Success at ScriptRock, will discuss how this cathartic moment will propel the DevOps movement from such stuff as dreams are made on to a prac...