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Construction in Russia - Key Trends and Opportunities to 2018

LONDON, Aug. 11, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Reportbuyer.com has added a new market research report:

Construction in Russia – Key Trends and Opportunities to 2018

https://www.reportbuyer.com/product/1361913/Construction-in-Russia-–-Key-Trends-and-Opportunities-to-2018.html

Synopsis

This report provides detailed market analysis, information and insights into Russian construction industry including:
• Russian construction industry's growth prospects by market, project type and type of construction activity
• Analysis of equipment, material and service costs across each project type within Russia
• Critical insight into the impact of industry trends and issues, and the risks and opportunities they present to participants in Russian construction industry
• Analyzing the profiles of the leading operators in Russian construction industry.
• Data highlights of the largest construction projects in Russia


Summary

The Russian construction industry recorded a review-period (2009-2013) compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 12.81%. Growth was supported by private and public investments in infrastructure, residential and commercial construction projects. Considering the role of modern infrastructure in achieving long-term growth, the Russian government invested heavily in road and rail projects. Industry growth is expected to continue over the forecast period (2014-2018), as a result of the government's commitment to making infrastructural improvements and an anticipated recovery in the global economy. Consequently, industry output is expected to record a CAGR of 7.36% over the forecast period.

Scope

This report provides a comprehensive analysis of the construction industry in Russia. It provides:
• Historical (2009-2013) and forecast (2014-2018) valuations of the construction industry in Russia using construction output and value-add methods
• Segmentation by sector (commercial, industrial, infrastructure, institutional and residential) and by project type
• Breakdown of values within each project type, by type of activity (new construction, repair and maintenance, refurbishment and demolition) and by type of cost (materials, equipment and services)
• Analysis of key construction industry issues, including regulation, cost management, funding and pricing
• Detailed profiles of the leading construction companies in Russia

Reasons To Buy

• Identify and evaluate market opportunities using our standardized valuation and forecasting methodologies
• Assess market growth potential at a micro-level with over 600 time-series data forecasts
• Understand the latest industry and market trends
• Formulate and validate business strategies using Timetric's critical and actionable insight
• Assess business risks, including cost, regulatory and competitive pressures
• Evaluate competitive risk and success factors


Key Highlights

• According to the Unified Interdepartmental Information and Statistical System, construction activity in Russia was fairly weak in 2013, with the industry's output posting a contraction of 1.6% in real terms. This followed respective annual real-term growth of 5.5% and 2.8% in 2011 and 2012. With a deteriorating business environment and capital outflow, due to conflict between Russia and Ukraine over control of the Crimean Peninsula, the construction industry's output is expected to remain weak over the forecast period.

• Infrastructure construction is expected to continue expanding over the forecast period, mainly driven by large-scale investment in the construction industry. Having already registered a boost from the construction of infrastructure facilities, as well as hosting the 2014 Winter Olympics, the nation's hosting of the 2018 Fifa World Cup will also require stadia, transport infrastructure, accommodation, hotels, airports and training bases. There are 11 host cities for the World Cup, indicating a broad demand for stadia, transport infrastructure and accommodation. According to the country's Ministry of Sport, RUB600.0 billion (US$19.1 billion) is required to be spent on various infrastructure construction projects in order to prepare for games.

• Significant investments are being made in the country's power sector to improve the energy quality, effectiveness, safety and security. The government introduced the Energy Strategy 2030 in 2009, under which electricity generation capacity will double from 225GWe in 2008 to 355-445GWe by 2030. A sum of RUB9.8 trillion (US$322.7 billion) will be spent on power plants by 2030, as well as RUB10.2 trillion (US$335.9 billion) on transmission.

Russia's rail transport network is the backbone of the nation's transport system, as 90% of goods in the country are transported by railways. Consequently, the government is focusing more on rail infrastructure development. Under the Strategy for Developing Rail Transport in the Russian Federation to 2030, Russian Railways (RZD) has laid out an ambitious plan to overhaul the country's rail network. Accordingly, the RZD is planning to construct 20,000km of new rail routes by 2030, as well as upgrade 13,800km freight lines for heavy-axel loads and acquire one million freight cars, 23,300 modern locomotives and 29,500 passenger cars.

• The hotel market is highly developed in major cities such as Moscow, Saint Petersburg and the Black Sea, and resort towns such as Sochi. Small cities with a population of around 1 million such as Pereslavl-Zalessky, Ryazan, Irkutsk and Lipetsk are registering a rise in the construction of hotel projects.
Table of Contents
1 Executive Summary
2 Market Overview
2.1 Key Trends and Issues
2.2 Benchmarking by Market Size and Growth
3 Commercial Construction
3.1 Performance Outlook
3.2 Key Trends and Issues
3.3 Data and Project Highlights
4 Industrial Construction
4.1 Performance Outlook
4.2 Key Trends and Issues
4.3 Data and Project Highlights
5 Infrastructure Construction
5.1 Performance Outlook
5.2 Key Trends and Issues
5.3 Data and Project Highlights
6 Institutional Construction
6.1 Performance Outlook
6.2 Key Trends and Issues
6.3 Data and Project Highlights
7 Residential Construction
7.1 Performance Outlook
7.2 Key Trends and Issues
7.3 Data and Project Highlights
8 Company Profile: Mostotrest OAO
8.1 Mostotrest OAO – Company Overview
8.2 Mostotrest OAO – Business Description
8.3 Mostotrest OAO – Main Services
8.4 Mostotrest OAO – History
8.5 Mostotrest OAO – Company Information
8.5.1 Mostotrest OAO – key competitors
8.5.2 Mostotrest OAO – key employees
9 Company Profile: Public Joint-Stock Company Stroytransgaz
9.1 Public Joint-Stock Company Stroytransgaz – Company Overview
9.2 Public Joint-Stock Company Stroytransgaz – Business Description
9.3 Public Joint-Stock Company Stroytransgaz – Main Services
9.4 Public Joint-Stock Company Stroytransgaz – History
9.5 Public Joint-Stock Company Stroytransgaz – Company Information
9.5.1 Public Joint-Stock Company Stroytransgaz – key competitors
9.5.2 Public Joint-Stock Company Stroytransgaz – key employees
10 Company Profile: Sibtruboprovodstroy OAO
10.1 Sibtruboprovodstroy OAO – Company Overview
10.2 Sibtruboprovodstroy OAO – Main Services
10.3 Sibtruboprovodstroy OAO – Company Information
10.3.1 Sibtruboprovodstroy OAO – key competitors
10.3.2 Sibtruboprovodstroy OAO – key employees
11 Company Profile: Kholdingovaya kompaniya Glavmosstroy OAO
11.1 Kholdingovaya kompaniya Glavmosstroy OAO – Company Overview
11.2 Kholdingovaya kompaniya Glavmosstroy OAO – Main Services
11.3 Kholdingovaya kompaniya Glavmosstroy OAO – Company Information
11.3.1 Kholdingovaya kompaniya Glavmosstroy OAO – key competitors
11.3.2 Kholdingovaya kompaniya Glavmosstroy OAO – key employee
12 Company Profile: Mostostroitel'nyi otryad No19 OAO (P)
12.1 Mostostroitel'nyi otryad No19 OAO (P) – Company Overview
12.2 Mostostroitel'nyi otryad No19 OAO (P) – Main Service
12.3 Mostostroitel'nyi otryad No19 OAO (P) – Company Information
12.3.1 Mostostroitel'nyi otryad No19 OAO (P) – key competitors
12.3.2 Mostostroitel'nyi otryad No19 OAO (P) – key employees
13 Market Data Analysis
13.1 Construction Output and Value Add
13.1.1 Construction output by project type
13.1.2 Construction output by cost type
13.1.3 Construction output by activity type
13.1.4 Construction value add by project type
13.2 Commercial Construction
13.2.1 Commercial construction output by project type
13.2.2 Commercial construction output by cost type
13.2.3 Commercial construction output by activity type
13.2.4 Commercial construction value add by project type
13.3 Industrial Construction
13.3.1 Industrial construction output by project type
13.3.2 Industrial construction output by cost type
13.3.3 Industrial construction output by activity type
13.3.4 Industrial construction value add by project type
13.4 Infrastructure Construction
13.4.1 Infrastructure construction output by project type
13.4.2 Infrastructure construction output by cost type
13.4.3 Infrastructure construction output by activity type
13.4.4 Infrastructure construction value add by project type
13.5 Institutional Construction
13.5.1 Institutional construction output by project type
13.5.2 Institutional construction output by cost type
13.5.3 Institutional construction output by activity type
13.5.4 Institutional construction value add by project type
13.6 Residential Construction
13.6.1 Residential construction output by project type
13.6.2 Residential construction output by cost type
13.6.3 Residential construction output by activity type
13.6.4 Residential construction value add by project type
14 Appendix
14.1 What is this Report About?
14.2 Definitions
14.3 Summary Methodology
14.4 Methodology
14.5 Contact Timetric
14.6 About Timetric
14.7 Timetric's Services
14.8 Disclaimer

List of Tables

Table 1: Benchmarking with Other Major Construction Industries
Table 2: Commercial Construction Project 1 – NCRC – Lagonaki Ski Resort Development – North Caucasus
Table 3: Commercial Construction Project 2 – NCRC – Elbrus-Bezengi Ski Resort Development – North Caucasus
Table 4: Commercial Construction Project 3 – Technopark – IngriaTechnopark Development – Leningrad
Table 5: Industrial Construction Project 1 – SK – Skolkovo Silicon Valley Innovation Center – Moscow
Table 6: Industrial Construction Project 2 – Prolf – Prokhorovsky Steel and Pipes Factory – Belgorod
Table 7: Industrial Construction Project 3 – GOZR – Udokanskoye Copper Mining Factory – Zabaikalsky
Table 8: Infrastructure Construction Project 1 – InterBering – China-Russia-Canada-America Rail Road Transit – Russia
Table 9: Infrastructure Construction Project 2 – RZD – Moscow to St Petersburg High-Speed Rail – Moscow
Table 10: Infrastructure Construction Project 3 – HSRL – Moscow-Kazan High-Speed Rail Line – Russia
Table 11: Institutional Construction Project 1 – EKADM – Shartash URFU New University Campus – Yekaterinburg
Table 12: Institutional Construction Project 2 – DAUDMR – Kommunarka Russian National Library New Building – Moscow
Table 13: Institutional Construction Project 3 – MoSRF – Cherkizovsky Museum Store and CSKA Hockey Center Development – Moscow
Table 14: Residential Construction Project 1 – Nur Holding – Kazan Luchezarny Residential Complex – Russia
Table 15: Residential Construction Project 2 – UPG – Residential Housing Development – St Petersburg
Table 16: Residential Construction Project 3 – Etalon LenSpetsSMU – Galaxy Residential Development – Saint Petersburg
Table 17: Mostotrest OAO, Key Facts
Table 18: Mostotrest OAO, Main Services
Table 19: Mostotrest OAO, History
Table 20: Mostotrest OAO, Key Employees
Table 21: Public Joint-Stock Company Stroytransgaz, Key Facts
Table 22: Public Joint-Stock Company Stroytransgaz, Main Services
Table 23: Public Joint-Stock Company Stroytransgaz, History
Table 24: Public Joint-Stock Company Stroytransgaz, Key Employees
Table 25: Sibtruboprovodstroy OAO, Key Facts
Table 26: Sibtruboprovodstroy OAO, Main Services
Table 27: Sibtruboprovodstroy OAO, Key Employees
Table 28: Kholdingovaya kompaniya Glavmosstroy OAO, Key Facts
Table 29: Kholdingovaya kompaniya Glavmosstroy OAO, Main Services
Table 30: Kholdingovaya kompaniya Glavmosstroy OAO, Key Employee
Table 31: Mostostroitel'nyi otryad No19 OAO (P), Key Facts
Table 32: Mostostroitel'nyi otryad No19 OAO (P), Main Service
Table 33: Mostostroitel'nyi otryad No19 OAO (P), Key Employees
Table 34: Russian Construction Output by Project Type (RUB Million), 2009–2013
Table 35: Russian Construction Output by Project Type (RUB Million), 2013–2018
Table 36: Russian Construction Output by Cost Type (RUB Million), 2009–2013
Table 37: Russian Construction Output by Cost Type (RUB Million), 2013–2018
Table 38: Russian Construction Output by Activity Type (RUB Million), 2009–2013
Table 39: Russian Construction Output by Activity Type (RUB Million), 2013–2018
Table 40: Russian Construction Value Add by Project Type (RUB Million), 2009–2013
Table 41: Russian Construction Value Add by Project Type (RUB Million), 2013–2018
Table 42: Russian Commercial Construction Output by Project Type (RUB Million), 2009–2013
Table 43: Russian Commercial Construction Output by Project Type (RUB Million), 2013–2018
Table 44: Russian Commercial Construction Output by Cost Type (RUB Million), 2009–2013
Table 45: Russian Commercial Construction Output by Cost Type (RUB Million), 2013–2018
Table 46: Russian Commercial Construction Output by Activity Type (RUB Million), 2009–2013
Table 47: Russian Commercial Construction Output by Activity Type (RUB Million), 2013–2018
Table 48: Russian Commercial Construction Value Add by Project Type (RUB Million), 2009–2013
Table 49: Russian Commercial Construction Value Add by Project Type (RUB Million), 2013–2018
Table 50: Russian Industrial Construction Output by Project Type (RUB Million), 2009–2013
Table 51: Russian Industrial Construction Output by Project Type (RUB Million), 2013–2018
Table 52: Russian Industrial Construction Output by Cost Type (RUB Million), 2009–2013
Table 53: Russian Industrial Construction Output by Cost Type (RUB Million), 2013–2018
Table 54: Russian Industrial Construction Output by Activity Type (RUB Million), 2009–2013
Table 55: Russian Industrial Construction Output by Activity Type (RUB Million), 2013–2018
Table 56: Russian Industrial Construction Value Add by Project Type (RUB Million), 2009–2013
Table 57: Russian Industrial Construction Value Add by Project Type (RUB Million), 2013–2018
Table 58: Russian Infrastructure Construction Output by Project Type (RUB Million), 2009–2013
Table 59: Russian Infrastructure Construction Output by Project Type (RUB Million), 2013–2018
Table 60: Russian Infrastructure Construction Output by Cost Type (RUB Million), 2009–2013
Table 61: Russian Infrastructure Construction Output by Cost Type (RUB Million), 2013–2018
Table 62: Russian Infrastructure Construction Output by Activity Type (RUB Million), 2009–2013
Table 63: Russian Infrastructure Construction Output by Activity Type (RUB Million), 2013–2018
Table 64: Russian Infrastructure Construction Value Add by Project Type (RUB Million), 2009–2013
Table 65: Russian Infrastructure Construction Value Add by Project Type (RUB Million), 2013–2018
Table 66: Russian Institutional Construction Output by Project Type (RUB Million), 2009–2013
Table 67: Russian Institutional Construction Output by Project Type (RUB Million), 2013–2018
Table 68: Russian Institutional Construction Output by Cost Type (RUB Million), 2009–2013
Table 69: Russian Institutional Construction Output by Cost Type (RUB Million), 2013–2018
Table 70: Russian Institutional Construction Output by Activity Type (RUB Million), 2009–2013
Table 71: Russian Institutional Construction Output by Activity Type (RUB Million), 2013–2018
Table 72: Russian Institutional Construction Value Add by Project Type (RUB Million), 2009–2013
Table 73: Russian Institutional Construction Value Add by Project Type (RUB Million), 2013–2018
Table 74: Russian Residential Construction Output by Project Type (RUB Million), 2009–2013
Table 75: Russian Residential Construction Output by Project Type (RUB Million), 2013–2018
Table 76: Russian Residential Construction Output by Cost Type (RUB Million), 2009–2013
Table 77: Russian Residential Construction Output by Cost Type (RUB Million), 2013–2018
Table 78: Russian Residential Construction Output by Activity Type (RUB Million), 2009–2013
Table 79: Russian Residential Construction Output by Activity Type (RUB Million), 2013–2018
Table 80: Russian Residential Construction Value Add by Project Type (RUB Million), 2009–2013
Table 81: Russian Residential Construction Value Add by Project Type (RUB Million), 2013–2018
Table 82: Timetric Construction Market Definitions

List of Figures
Figure 1: Growth Matrix for Construction Output in Russian (%), 2009–2018
Figure 2: Benchmarking with Other Major Construction Industries (%), 2009–2018
Figure 3: Russian Commercial Construction Output (US$ Million), 2009–2018
Figure 4: Russian Industrial Construction Output (US$ Million), 2009–2018
Figure 5: Russian Infrastructure Construction Output (US$ Million), 2009–2018
Figure 6: Russian Institutional Construction Output (US$ Million), 2009–2018
Figure 7: Russian Residential Construction Output (US$ Million), 2009–2018
Figure 8: Russian Construction Output by Project Type (RUB Million), 2009–2018
Figure 9: Russian Construction Output by Cost Type (RUB Million), 2009–2018
Figure 10: Russian Construction Output by Activity Type (RUB Million), 2009–2018
Figure 11: Russian Construction Value Add by Project Type (RUB Million), 2009–2018
Figure 12: Russian Commercial Construction Output by Project Type (RUB Million), 2009–2018
Figure 13: Russian Commercial Construction Output by Cost Type (RUB Million), 2009–2018
Figure 14: Russian Commercial Construction Output by Activity Type (RUB Million), 2009–2018
Figure 15: Russian Commercial Construction Value Add by Project Type (RUB Million), 2009–2018
Figure 16: Russian Industrial Construction Output by Project Type (RUB Million), 2009–2018
Figure 17: Russian Industrial Construction Output by Cost Type (RUB Million), 2009–2018
Figure 18: Russian Industrial Construction Output by Activity Type (RUB Million), 2009–2018
Figure 19: Russian Industrial Construction Value Add by Project Type (RUB Million), 2009–2018
Figure 20: Russian Infrastructure Construction Output by Project Type (RUB Million), 2009–2018
Figure 21: Russian Infrastructure Construction Output by Cost Type (RUB Million), 2009–2018
Figure 22: Russian Infrastructure Construction Output by Activity Type (RUB Million), 2009–2018
Figure 23: Russian Infrastructure Construction Value Add by Project Type (RUB Million), 2009–2018
Figure 24: Russian Institutional Construction Output by Project Type (RUB Million), 2009–2018
Figure 25: Russian Institutional Construction Output by Cost Type (RUB Million), 2009–2018
Figure 26: Russian Institutional Construction Output by Activity Type (RUB Million), 2009–2018
Figure 27: Russian Institutional Construction Value Add by Project Type (RUB Million), 2009–2018
Figure 28: Russian Residential Construction Output by Project Type (RUB Million), 2009–2018
Figure 29: Russian Residential Construction Output by Cost Type (RUB Million), 2009–2018
Figure 30: Russian Residential Construction Output by Activity Type (RUB Million), 2009–2018
Figure 31: Russian Residential Construction Value Add by Project Type (RUB Million), 2009–2018

Read the full report:
Construction in Russia – Key Trends and Opportunities to 2018

https://www.reportbuyer.com/product/1361913/Construction-in-Russia-–-Key-Trends-and-Opportunities-to-2018.html

For more information:
Sarah Smith
Research Advisor at Reportbuyer.com
Email: [email protected]
Tel: +44 208 816 85 48
Website: www.reportbuyer.com

SOURCE ReportBuyer

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