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Personal Accident and Health Insurance in Canada, Key Trends and Opportunities to 2017

NEW YORK, Aug. 20, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report is available in its catalogue:

Personal Accident and Health Insurance in Canada, Key Trends and Opportunities to 2017

http://www.reportlinker.com/p01044771/Personal-Accident-and-Health-Insurance-in-Canada-Key-Trends-and-Opportunities-to-2017.html

Synopsis

The report provides in depth market analysis, information and insights into the Canadian personal accident and health insurance segment, including:
• The Canadian personal accident and health insurance segment's growth prospects by insurance categories
• Key trends and drivers for the personal accident and health insurance segment
• The various distribution channels in the Canadian personal accident and health insurance segment
• The detailed competitive landscape in the personal accident and health insurance segment in Canada
• Regulatory policies of the Canadian insurance industry
• A description of the personal accident and health reinsurance segment in Canada
• Porter's Five Forces Analysis of the personal accident and health insurance segment
• A benchmarking section on the Canadian life insurance segment in comparison with other countries with US$60–US$150 billion in gross written premium

Summary

The Canadian personal accident and health insurance segment grew from CAD16.1 billion (US$15.1 billion) in 2008 to CAD20.5 billion (US$20.6 billion) in 2012, at a review-period CAGR of 6.3%. The growth resulted from an increased number of outbound travelers from Canada, rising demand for private health insurance products as a result of inadequate publicly funded healthcare and a rising elderly population which consumes more health insurance products. These factors, coupled with the improving business and environmental conditions in the US, the largest trading partner and importer of Canada's goods, is expected to support the growth of the Canadian personal accident and health insurance segment over the forecast period (2013–2017). As such, the Canadian personal accident and health segment is expected to grow at a CAGR of 5.8% over the forecast period.

Scope

This report provides a comprehensive analysis of the personal accident and health insurance segment in Canada:
• It provides historical values for the Canadian personal accident and health insurance segment for the report's 2008–2012 review period and forecast figures for the 2012–2017 forecast period.
• It offers a detailed analysis of the key categories in the Canadian personal accident and health insurance segment, along with market forecasts until 2017.
• It covers an exhaustive list of parameters, including written premium, incurred loss, loss ratio, commissions and expenses, combined ratio, frauds and crimes, total assets, total investment income and retentions.
• It analyses the various distribution channels for personal accident and health insurance products in Canada.
• Using Porter's industry-standard "Five Forces" analysis, it details the competitive landscape in Canada for the personal accident and health insurance segment.
• It provides a detailed analysis of the reinsurance segment in Canada and its growth prospects.
• It profiles the top personal accident and health insurance companies in Canada and outlines the key regulations affecting them.

Reasons To Buy

• Make strategic business decisions using in-depth historic and forecast market data related to the Canadian personal accident and health insurance segment and each category within it
• Understand the demand-side dynamics, key market trends and growth opportunities within the Canadian personal accident and health insurance segment
• Assess the competitive dynamics in the personal accident and health insurance segment, along with the reinsurance segment
• Identify the growth opportunities and market dynamics within key product categories
• Gain insights into key regulations governing the Canadian insurance segment and its impact on companies and the market's future

Key Highlights

• The Canadian personal accident and health segment rose from CAD16.1 billion (US$15.1 billion) in 2008 to CAD20.5 billion (US$20.6 billion) in 2012, at a CAGR of 6.3% during the review period.
• The growth was a product of the increased number of outbound travelers from Canada, rising demand for private health insurance products from an inadequate public system, and the rising elderly population.
• The health category is controlled by the public sector, while private health insurers complement the public healthcare system by providing non-urgent and elective treatments.
• The main distribution channels for personal accident and health insurers in Canada are agencies, brokers and direct marketing
•The personal accident and health segment is competitive with the presence of both domestic and overseas businesses.

Table of Contents
1 Executive Summary
2 Introduction
2.1 What is this Report About?
2.2 Definitions
2.3 Methodology
3 Regional Market Dynamics
3.1 Overview
3.1.1 Market trends
3.1.2 Market size
4 Personal Accident and Health Insurance Segment – Regional Benchmarking
4.1 Scale and Penetration
4.1.1 Total market gross written premium
4.1.2 Premium per capita
4.1.3 Personal accident and health insurance penetration (as a percentage of GDP)
4.2 Growth
4.2.1 Gross written premium
4.2.2 Gross written premium per capita
4.3 Efficiency and Risk
4.3.1 Loss ratio
4.3.2 Combined ratio
4.3.3 Incurred losses per capita
4.3.4 Incurred losses as a percentage of GDP
4.4 Distribution Channels
4.4.1 Direct marketing
4.4.2 Insurance brokers
4.4.3 Bancassurance

4.4.4 Agencies
5 Canadian Insurance Industry Attractiveness
5.1 Insurance Industry Size, 2008–2017
5.2 Key Industry Trends and Drivers
5.2.1 Business drivers
6 Personal Accident and Health Insurance Segment Outlook
6.1 Personal Accident and Health Insurance Growth Prospects by Category
6.1.1 Personal accident insurance
6.1.2 Travel insurance
6.1.3 Health insurance
7 Analysis by Distribution Channels
7.1 Direct Marketing
7.2 Bancassurance
7.3 Agencies
7.4 E-commerce
7.5 Brokers
7.6 Other Channels
8 Porter's Five Forces Analysis – Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance
8.1 Bargaining power of suppliers: Low to Medium
8.2 Bargaining Power of Buyers: Low to Medium
8.3 Barriers to Entry: Medium to High
8.4 Intensity of Rivalry: Medium

8.5 Threat of Substitutes: Medium
9 Reinsurance Growth Dynamics and Challenges
9.1 Reinsurance Segment Size, 2008–2017
9.2 Reinsurance Segment Size by Type of Insurance, 2008–2017
10 Governance, Risk and Compliance
10.1 Legislation Overview and Historical Evolution
10.2 Legislation Trends by Type of Insurance
10.2.1 Life insurance regulatory trends
10.2.2 Property insurance regulatory trends
10.2.3 Motor insurance regulatory trends
10.2.4 Marine, aviation and transit insurance regulatory trends
10.2.5 Personal accident and health insurance regulatory trends
10.3 Compulsory Insurance
10.3.1 Motor third-party liability insurance
10.3.2 Marine liability insurance
10.3.3 Workmen's compensation insurance
10.4 Supervision and Control
10.4.1 International Association of Insurance Supervisors (IAIS)
10.4.2 Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions Canada (OSFI)
10.4.3 Canadian Council of Insurance Regulators (CCIR)
10.5 Non-Admitted Insurance Regulatory Trends
10.5.1 Overview
10.5.2 Intermediaries
10.5.3 Market practices
10.5.4 Fines and penalties
10.6 Company Registration and Operations
10.6.1 Types of insurance organization
10.6.2 Establishing a local company
10.6.3 Foreign ownership
10.6.4 Types of license

10.6.5 Capital requirements
10.6.6 Solvency margins
10.6.7 Reserve requirements
10.6.8 Investment regulations
10.6.9 Statutory return requirements
10.7 Taxation
10.7.1 Insurance premium or policy taxation
10.7.2 Corporate tax
10.7.3 VAT
10.7.4 Captives
10.8 Legal System
10.8.1 Introduction
10.8.2 Access to court
10.8.3 Alternative dispute resolution (ADR)
11 Competitive Landscape and Strategic Insights
11.1 Overview
11.2 Leading Companies in the Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance Segment
11.3 The Manufacturers Life Insurance Company – Company Overview
11.3.1 The Manufacturers Life Insurance Company – key facts
11.4 Sun Life Assurance Company – Company Overview
11.4.1 Sun Life Assurance Company – key facts
11.5 The Great-West Life Assurance Company – Company Overview
11.5.1 The Great-West Life Assurance Company – key facts
11.6 RBC Life Insurance Company – Company Overview
11.6.1 RBC Life Insurance Company – key facts
11.7 The Canada Life Assurance Company – Company Overview
11.7.1 The Canada Life Assurance Company – key facts
12 Business Environment and Country Risk

12.1 Business Confidence
12.1.1 Market capitalization trend – Canadian Stock Exchange, Canada
12.2 Economic Performance
12.2.1 GDP at constant prices (US$)
12.2.2 GDP per capita at constant prices (US$)
12.2.3 GDP at current prices (US$)
12.2.4 GDP per capita at current prices (US$)
12.2.5 GDP by key segments
12.2.6 Agriculture, hunting, forestry and fishing net output at current prices (US$)
12.2.7 Agriculture, hunting, forestry and fishing net output at current prices as a percentage of GDP
12.2.8 Manufacturing net output at current prices (US$)
12.2.9 Manufacturing net output at current prices as a percentage of GDP
12.2.10 Mining, manufacturing and utilities at current prices (US$)
12.2.11 Mining, manufacturing and utilities at current prices as a percentage of GDP
12.2.12 Construction net output at current prices (US$)
12.2.13 Construction net output at current prices as a percentage of GDP
12.2.14 Inflation rate
12.2.15 Exports as a percentage of GDP
12.2.16 Imports as a percentage of GDP
12.2.17 Exports growth
12.2.18 Imports growth
12.2.19 Annual average exchange rate US$–CAD
12.3 Infrastructure
12.3.1 Commercial vehicles Imports – total value
12.3.2 Commercial vehicles exports – total value
12.3.3 Automotive exports – total value
12.3.4 Automotive imports – total value

12.3.5 Total internet subscribers
12.4 Labor Force
12.4.1 Labor force
12.4.2 Unemployment rate
12.5 Demographics
12.5.1 Gross national disposable income
12.5.2 Household consumption expenditure
12.5.3 Total population
12.5.4 Urban and rural populations
12.5.5 Age distribution of the total population
13 Appendix
13.1 Methodology
13.2 Contact Timetric
13.3 About Timetric
13.4 Timetric's Services
13.5 Disclaimer

List of Tables
Table 1: Insurance Industry Definitions
Table 2: Peer Group (US$60–US$150 Billion) Insurance Markets – Health Expenditure (% of GDP), 2008–2010
Table 3: Canadian Insurance – Overall Written Premium by Segment (CAD Billion), 2008–2012
Table 4: Canadian Insurance – Overall Written Premium by Segment (US$ Billion), 2008–2012
Table 5: Canadian Insurance – Overall Written Premium by Segment (CAD Billion), 2012–2017
Table 6: Canadian Insurance – Overall Written Premium by Segment (US$ Billion), 2012–2017
Table 7: Canadian Insurance – Segmentation (% Share), 2008–2017
Table 8: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Written Premium by Category (CAD Billion), 2008–2012

Table 9: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Written Premium by Category (US$ Billion), 2008–2012
Table 10: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Written Premium by Category (CAD Billion), 2012–2017
Table 11: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Written Premium by Category (US$ Billion), 2012–2017
Table 12: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Earned Premium (CAD Billion), 2008–2012
Table 13: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Earned Premium (CAD Billion), 2012–2017
Table 14: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Paid Claims by Category (CAD Billion), 2008–2012
Table 15: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Paid Claims by Category (US$ Billion), 2008–2012
Table 16: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Paid Claims by Category (CAD Billion), 2012–2017
Table 17: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Paid Claims by Category (US$ Billion), 2012–2017
Table 18: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Incurred Loss by Category (CAD Billion), 2008–2012
Table 19: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Incurred Loss by Category (US$ Billion), 2008–2012
Table 20: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Incurred Loss by Category (CAD Billion), 2012–2017
Table 21: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Incurred Loss by Category (US$ Billion), 2012–2017
Table 22: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Loss Ratio (%), 2008–2012
Table 23: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Loss Ratio (%), 2012–2017
Table 24: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Commission and Expenses (CAD Billion), 2008–2012

Table 25: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Commission and Expenses (CAD Billion), 2012–2017
Table 26: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Combined Ratio (%), 2008–2012
Table 27: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Combined Ratio (%), 2012–2017
Table 28: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Frauds and Crimes (CAD Billion), 2008–2012
Table 29: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Frauds and Crimes (CAD Billion), 2012–2017
Table 30: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Total Assets (CAD Billion), 2008–2012
Table 31: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Total Assets (CAD Billion), 2012–2017
Table 32: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Total Investment Income (CAD Billion), 2008–2012
Table 33: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Total Investment Income (CAD Billion), 2012–2017
Table 34: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Retentions (CAD Billion), 2008–2012
Table 35: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Retentions (CAD Billion), 2012–2017
Table 36: Canadian Personal Accident Insurance – Number of Policies Sold (Thousand), 2008–2012
Table 37: Canadian Personal Accident Insurance – Number of Policies Sold (Thousand), 2012–2017
Table 38: Canadian Personal Accident Insurance – Written Premium (CAD Billion), 2008–2012
Table 39: Canadian Personal Accident Insurance – Written Premium (CAD Billion), 2012–2017
Table 40: Canadian Personal Accident Insurance – Loss Ratio (%), 2008–2012
Table 41: Canadian Personal Accident Insurance – Loss Ratio (%), 2012–2017
Table 42: Canadian Travel Insurance – Number of Policies Sold (Thousand), 2008–2012
Table 43: Canadian Travel Insurance – Number of Policies Sold (Thousand), 2012–2017
Table 44: Canadian Travel Insurance – Written Premium (CAD Billion), 2008–2012
Table 45: Canadian Travel Insurance – Written Premium (CAD Billion), 2012–2017
Table 46: Canadian Travel Insurance – Loss Ratio (%), 2008–2012
Table 47: Canadian Travel Insurance – Loss Ratio (%), 2012–2017
Table 48: Canadian Health Insurance – Number of Policies Sold (Thousand), 2008–2012
Table 49: Canadian Health Insurance – Number of Policies Sold (Thousand), 2012–2017
Table 50: Canadian Health Insurance – Written Premium (CAD Billion), 2008–2012
Table 51: Canadian Health Insurance – Written Premium (CAD Billion), 2012–2017
Table 52: Canadian Non-Life Health Insurance – Loss Ratio (%), 2008–2012

Table 53: Canadian Health Insurance – Loss Ratio (%), 2012–2017
Table 54: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Direct Marketing Commission Paid (CAD Million), 2008–2012
Table 55: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Direct Marketing Commission Paid (CAD Million), 2012–2017
Table 56: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Written Premium Through Direct Marketing (CAD Million), 2008–2012
Table 57: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Written Premium Through Direct Marketing (CAD Billion), 2012–2017
Table 58: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Policies Sold Through Direct Marketing (Thousand), 2008–2012
Table 59: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Policies Sold Through Direct Marketing (Thousand), 2012–2017
Table 60: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Number of Direct Marketing Distributors, 2008–2012
Table 61: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Number of Direct Marketing Distributors, 2012–2017
Table 62: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Bancassurance Commission Paid (CAD Million), 2008–2012
Table 63: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Bancassurance Commission Paid (CAD Million), 2012–2017
Table 64: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Written Premium Through Bancassurance (CAD Million), 2008–2012
Table 65: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Written Premium Through Bancassurance (CAD Million), 2012–2017
Table 66: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Policies Sold Through Bancassurance (Thousand), 2008–2012
Table 67: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Policies Sold Through Bancassurance (Thousand), 2012–2017
Table 68: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Number of Bancassurance Distributors, 2008–2012
Table 69: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Number of Bancassurance Distributors, 2012–2017
Table 70: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Commission Paid to Agencies (CAD Billion), 2008–2012

Table 71: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Commission Paid to Agencies (CAD Billion), 2012–2017
Table 72: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Written Premium Through Agencies (CAD Billion), 2008–2012
Table 73: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Written Premium Through Agencies (CAD Billion), 2012–2017
Table 74: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Policies Sold Through Agencies (Thousand), 2008–2012
Table 75: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Policies Sold Through Agencies (Thousand), 2012–2017
Table 76: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Number of Agencies, 2008–2012
Table 77: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Number of Agencies, 2012–2017
Table 78: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – E-Commerce Commission Paid (CAD Million), 2008–2012
Table 79: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – E-Commerce Commission Paid (CAD Million), 2012–2017
Table 80: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Written Premium Through E-Commerce (CAD Billion), 2008–2012
Table 81: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Written Premium Through E-Commerce (CAD Million), 2012–2017
Table 82: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Policies Sold Through E-Commerce (Thousand), 2008–2012
Table 83: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Policies Sold Through E-Commerce (Thousand), 2012–2017
Table 84: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Number of E-Commerce Distributors, 2008–2012
Table 85: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Number of E-Commerce Distributors, 2012–2017
Table 86: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Commission Paid to Brokers (CAD Billion), 2008–2012

Table 87: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Commission Paid to Brokers (CAD Billion), 2012–2017
Table 88: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Written Premium Through Brokers (CAD Billion), 2008–2012
Table 89: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Written Premium Through Brokers (CAD Billion), 2012–2017
Table 90: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Policies Sold Through Brokers (Thousand), 2008–2012
Table 91: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Policies Sold Through Brokers (Thousand), 2012–2017
Table 92: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Number of Brokers, 2008–2012
Table 93: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Number of Brokers, 2012–2017
Table 94: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Commission Paid to Other Channels (CAD Million), 2008–2012
Table 95: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Commission Paid to Other Channels (CAD Million), 2012–2017
Table 96: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Written Premium Through Other Channels (CAD Million), 2008–2012
Table 97: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Written Premium Through Other Channels (CAD Million), 2012–2017
Table 98: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Policies Sold Through Other Channels (Thousand), 2008–2012
Table 99: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Policies Sold Through Other Channels (Thousand), 2012–2017
Table 100: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Number of Distributors in Other Channels, 2008–2012
Table 101: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Number of Distributors in Other Channels, 2012–2017

Table 102: Reinsurance in Canadian by Category (CAD Billion), 2008–2012
Table 103: Reinsurance in Canadian by Category (US$ Billion), 2008–2012
Table 104: Reinsurance in Canada by Category (CAD Billion), 2012–2017
Table 105: Reinsurance in Canada by Category (US$ Billion), 2012–2017
Table 106: Canadian Premium Ceded to Reinsurance by Type of Insurance (CAD Billion), 2008–2012
Table 107: Canadian Premium Ceded to Reinsurance by Type of Insurance (US$ Billion), 2008–2012
Table 108: Canadian Premium Ceded to Reinsurance by Type of Insurance (CAD Billion), 2012–2017
Table 109: Canadian Premium Ceded to Reinsurance by Type of Insurance (US$ Billion), 2012–2017
Table 110: Canadian Life Insurance – Percentage of Reinsurance Ceded (%), 2008–2012
Table 111: Canadian Life Insurance – Percentage of Reinsurance Ceded (%), 2012–2017
Table 112: Canada – Legislations Governing Automobile Insurance in Each Province and Territory
Table 113: Canada – Workmen's Compensation Insurance
Table 114: Canada – Non-Admitted Insurance Regulatory Framework
Table 115: Canada – Legislations Governing Motor Insurance in Each Province and Territory
Table 116: Canada – Solvency Margin Requirements for Federally Regulated Insurance Companies
Table 117: Canada – Insurance Premium Taxation 2012–2013
Table 118: Canada – Corporate Taxation 2012–2013
Table 119: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance, 2012
Table 120: The Manufacturers Life Insurance Company, Key Facts
Table 121: Sun Life Assurance Company, Key Facts
Table 122: The Great-West Life Assurance Company, Key Facts
Table 123: RBC Life Insurance Company, Key Facts
Table 124: The Canada Life Assurance Company, Key Facts

List of Figures
Figure 1: Peer Group (US$60–US$150 Billion) Insurance Markets – A Snapshot of the Economies and Populations, 2011
Figure 2: Peer Group (US$60–US$150 Billion) Insurance Markets – Growth Trends in the Insurance Industry
Figure 3: Peer Group (US$60–US$150 Billion) Insurance Markets – Total Industry Values by Segment (US$ Billion), 2011
Figure 4: Peer Group (US$60–US$150 Billion) Insurance Markets – Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Growth Trends
Figure 5: Peer Group (US$60–US$150 Billion) Insurance Markets – Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Gross Written Premiums (US$ Billion), 2011
Figure 6: Peer Group (US$60–US$150 Billion) Insurance Markets – Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Premiums Per Capita (US$), 2011
Figure 7: Peer Group (US$60–US$150 Billion) Insurance Markets – Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Penetration (% of GDP), 2011 and 2016
Figure 8: Peer Group (US$60–US$150 Billion) Insurance Markets – Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Gross Written Premium Growth (%), 2007–2016
Figure 9: Peer Group (US$60–US$150 Billion) Insurance Markets – Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Gross Written Premium Capita Growth (%), 2007–2016
Figure 10: Peer Group (US$60–US$150 Billion) Insurance Markets – Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Loss Ratios (%), 2011 and 2016

Figure 11: Peer Group (US$60–US$150 Billion) Insurance Markets – Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Incurred Losses per Capita (US$), 2011 and 2016
Figure 12: Peer Group (US$60–US$150 Billion) Insurance Markets – Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Incurred Losses per Capita (US$), 2011 and 2016
Figure 13: Peer Group (US$60–US$150 Billion) Insurance Markets – Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Incurred Losses as a Percentage of GDP (%), 2011 and 2016
Figure 14: Peer Group (US$60–US$150 Billion) Insurance Markets – Direct Marketing – Share of Personal Accident and Health Insurance Gross Written Premium (%), 2007–2016
Figure 15: Peer Group (US$60–US$150 Billion) Insurance Markets – Bancassurance – Share of Personal Accident and Health Insurance Gross Written Premium (%), 2007–2016
Figure 16: Peer Group (US$60–US$150 Billion) Insurance Markets – Bancassurance – Share of Personal Accident and Health Insurance Gross Written Premium (%), 2007–2016.
Figure 17: Peer Group (US$60–US$150 Billion) Insurance Markets – Agencies – Share of Personal Accident and Health insurance Gross Written Premium (%), 2007–2016
Figure 18: Canadian Insurance – Overall Written Premium by Segment (CAD Billion), 2008–2017
Figure 19: Canadian Insurance – Dynamics by Segment (%), 2008–2017
Figure 20: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Written Premium by Category (CAD Billion), 2008–2017
Figure 21: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Written Premium by Category (% Share), 2012 and 2017
Figure 22: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Dynamics by Category, 2008–2017
Figure 23: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Earned Premium (CAD Billion), 2008–2012
Figure 24: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Earned Premium (CAD Billion), 2012–2017

Figure 25: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Paid Claims by Category (CAD Billion), 2008–2017
Figure 26: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Incurred Loss by Category (CAD Billion), 2008–2017
Figure 27: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Loss Ratio (%), 2008–2012
Figure 28: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Loss Ratio (%), 2012–2017
Figure 29: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Commission and Expenses (CAD Billion), 2008–2012
Figure 30: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Commission and Expenses (CAD Billion), 2012–2017
Figure 31: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Combined Ratio (%), 2008–2012
Figure 32: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Combined Ratio (%), 2012–2017
Figure 33: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Frauds and Crimes (CAD Billion), 2008–2012
Figure 34: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Frauds and Crimes (CAD Billion), 2012–2017
Figure 35: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Total Assets (CAD Billion), 2008–2012
Figure 36: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Total Assets (CAD Billion), 2012–2017
Figure 37: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Total Investment Income (CAD Billion), 2008–2012
Figure 38: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Total Investment Income (CAD Billion), 2012–2017
Figure 39: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Retentions (CAD Billion), 2008–2012
Figure 40: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Retentions (CAD Billion), 2012–2017
Figure 41: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Investment Portfolio (CAD Billion), 2008–2012
Figure 42: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Investment Portfolio (% Share), 2008 and 2012
Figure 43: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Penetration (%), 2008–2012
Figure 44: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Number of Policies Sold (Thousand), 2008–2012

Figure 45: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Number of Policies Sold (Thousand), 2012–2017
Figure 46: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Premium per Capita (CAD), 2008–2012
Figure 47: Canadian Personal Accident Insurance – Number of Policies Sold (Thousand), 2008–2012
Figure 48: Canadian Personal Accident Insurance – Number of Policies Sold (Thousand), 2012–2017
Figure 49: Canadian Personal Accident Insurance – Written Premium (CAD Billion), 2008–2012
Figure 50: Canadian Personal Accident Insurance – Written Premium (CAD Billion), 2012–2017
Figure 51: Canadian Personal Accident Insurance – Loss Ratio (%), 2008–2012
Figure 52: Canadian Personal Accident Insurance – Loss Ratio (%), 2012–2017
Figure 53: Canadian Travel Insurance – Number of Policies Sold (Thousand), 2008–2012
Figure 54: Canadian Travel Insurance – Number of Policies Sold (Thousand), 2012–2017
Figure 55: Canadian Travel Insurance – Written Premium (CAD Billion), 2008–2012
Figure 56: Canadian Travel Insurance – Written Premium (CAD Billion), 2012–2017
Figure 57: Canadian Travel Insurance – Loss Ratio (%), 2008–2012
Figure 58: Canadian Travel Insurance – Loss Ratio (%), 2012–2017
Figure 59: Canadian Health Insurance – Number of Policies Sold (Thousand), 2008–2012
Figure 60: Canadian Health Insurance – Number of Policies Sold (Thousand), 2012–2017
Figure 61: Canadian Health Insurance – Written Premium (CAD Billion), 2008–2012
Figure 62: Canadian Health Insurance – Written Premium (CAD Billion), 2012–2017

Figure 63: Canadian Non-Life Health Insurance – Loss Ratio (%), 2008–2012
Figure 64: Canadian Health Insurance – Loss Ratio (%), 2012–2017
Figure 65: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Written Premium by Distribution Channel (% Share), 2012 and 2017
Figure 66: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Direct Marketing Commission Paid (CAD Million), 2008–2012
Figure 67: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Direct Marketing Commission Paid (CAD Million), 2012–2017
Figure 68: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Written Premium Through Direct Marketing (CAD Million), 2008–2012
Figure 69: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Written Premium Through Direct Marketing (CAD Billion), 2012–2017
Figure 70: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Policies Sold Through Direct Marketing (Thousand), 2008–2012
Figure 71: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Policies Sold Through Direct Marketing (Thousand), 2012–2017
Figure 72: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Number of Direct Marketing Distributors, 2008–2012
Figure 73: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Number of Direct Marketing Distributors, 2012–2017
Figure 74: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Bancassurance Commission Paid (CAD Million), 2008–2012

Figure 75: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Bancassurance Commission Paid (CAD Million), 2012–2017
Figure 76: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Written Premium Through Bancassurance (CAD Million), 2008–2012
Figure 77: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Written Premium Through Bancassurance (CAD Million), 2012–2017
Figure 78: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Policies Sold Through Bancassurance (Thousand), 2008–2012
Figure 79: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Policies Sold Through Bancassurance (Thousand), 2012–2017
Figure 80: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Number of Bancassurance Distributors, 2008–2012
Figure 81: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Number of Bancassurance Distributors, 2012–2017
Figure 82: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Commission Paid to Agencies (CAD Billion), 2008–2012
Figure 83: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Commission Paid to Agencies (CAD Billion), 2012–2017
Figure 84: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Written Premium Through Agencies (CAD Billion), 2008–2012
Figure 85: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Written Premium Through Agencies (CAD Billion), 2012–2017
Figure 86: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Policies Sold Through Agencies (Thousand), 2008–2012
Figure 87: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Policies Sold Through Agencies (Thousand), 2012–2017
Figure 88: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Number of Agencies, 2008–2012
Figure 89: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Number of Agencies, 2012–2017
Figure 90: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – E-Commerce Commission Paid (CAD Million), 2008–2012

Figure 91: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – E-Commerce Commission Paid (CAD Million), 2012–2017
Figure 92: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Written Premium Through E-Commerce (CAD Million), 2008–2012
Figure 93: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Written Premium Through E-Commerce (CAD Million), 2012–2017
Figure 94: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Policies Sold Through E-Commerce (Thousand), 2008–2012
Figure 95: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Policies Sold Through E-Commerce (Thousand), 2012–2017
Figure 96: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Number of E-Commerce Distributors, 2008–2012
Figure 97: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Number of E-Commerce Distributors, 2012–2017
Figure 98: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Commission Paid to Brokers (CAD Billion), 2008–2012
Figure 99: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Commission Paid to Brokers (CAD Billion), 2012–2017
Figure 100: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Written Premium Through Brokers (CAD Billion), 2008–2012
Figure 101: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Written Premium Through Brokers (CAD Billion), 2012–2017
Figure 102: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Policies Sold Through Brokers (Thousand), 2008–2012
Figure 103: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Policies Sold Through Brokers (Thousand), 2012–2017
Figure 104: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Number of Brokers, 2008–2012
Figure 105: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Number of Brokers, 2012–2017
Figure 106: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Commission Paid to Other Channels (CAD Million), 2008–2012
Figure 107: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Commission Paid to Other Channels (CAD Million), 2012–2017
Figure 108: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Written Premium Through Other Channels (CAD Million), 2008–2012

Figure 109: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Written Premium Through Other Channels (CAD Million), 2012–2017
Figure 110: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Policies Sold Through Other Channels (Thousand), 2008–2012
Figure 111: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Policies Sold Through Other Channels (Thousand), 2012–2017
Figure 112: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Number of Distributors in Other Channels, 2008–2012
Figure 113: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Number of Distributors in Other Channels, 2012–2017
Figure 114: Canadian Personal Accident and Health Insurance – Five Forces Analysis
Figure 115: Canadian Premium Ceded to Reinsurance by Category (CAD Billion), 2008–2017
Figure 116: Canadian Premium Ceded to Reinsurance by Category (% Share), 2012 and 2017
Figure 117: Canadian Reinsurance – Dynamics by Category (%), 2008–2017
Figure 118: Canadian Premium Ceded to Reinsurance by Type of Insurance (CAD Billion), 2008–2017
Figure 119: Canadian Reinsurance – Dynamics by Type of Insurance (%), 2008–2017
Figure 120: Canadian Life Insurance – Percentage of Reinsurance Ceded (%), 2008–2012
Figure 121: Canadian Life Insurance – Percentage of Reinsurance Ceded (%), 2012–2017
Figure 122: Canada – Insurance Regulatory Framework
Figure 123: Canada – Insurance Supervision and Control at Various Levels
Figure 124: Canada – Insurance Regulatory Frameworks for Company Registration and Operation
Figure 125: Canada – Solvency Framework in Different Provinces and Territories
Figure 126: Canada – Judiciary System
Figure 127: Canadian Stock Exchange Market Capitalization (US$ Billion), 2008–2012
Figure 128: Canadian GDP at Constant Prices (US$ Billion), 2008–2012
Figure 129: Canadian GDP Per Capita at Constant Prices (US$), 2008–2012
Figure 130: Canadian GDP at Current Prices (US$ Billion), 2008–2012

Figure 131: Canadian GDP Per Capita at Current Prices (US$), 2008–2012
Figure 132: Canadian GDP by Key Segments (%), 2007 and 2010
Figure 133: Canadian Agriculture, Hunting, Forestry and Fishing Net Output at Current Prices (US$ Billion), 2007–2010
Figure 134: Canadian Agriculture, Hunting, Forestry and Fishing Net Output at Current Prices as a Percentage of GDP (%), 2007–2010
Figure 135: Canadian Manufacturing Net Output at Current Prices (US$ Billion), 2007–2010
Figure 136: Canadian Manufacturing Net Output at Current Prices as a Percentage of GDP (%), 2007–2010
Figure 137: Canadian Mining, Manufacturing and Utilities Net Output at Current Prices (US$ Billion), 2007–2010
Figure 138: Canadian Mining, Manufacturing and Utilities Net Output at Current Prices as a Percentage of GDP (%), 2007–2010
Figure 139: Canadian Construction Net Output at Current Prices (US$ Billion), 2007–2010
Figure 140: Canadian Construction Output at Current Prices as a Percentage of GDP (%), 2007–2010
Figure 141: Canadian Inflation Rate (%), 2008–2012
Figure 142: Canadian Exports as a Percentage of GDP (%), 2007–2011
Figure 143: Canadian Imports as a Percentage of GDP (%), 2007–2011
Figure 144: Canadian Exports Growth (%), 2008–2011
Figure 145: Canadian Imports Growth (%), 2008–2011
Figure 146: Canadian Annual Average Exchange Rate US$–CAD, 2008–2012
Figure 147:

To order this report: Personal Accident and Health Insurance in Canada, Key Trends and Opportunities to 2017
http://www.reportlinker.com/p01044771/Personal-Accident-and-Health-Insurance-in-Canada-Key-Trends-and-Opportunities-to-2017.html

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