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Travel and Tourism in Australia to 2018

LONDON, Aug. 26, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Reportbuyer.com has added a new market research report:

Travel and Tourism in Australia to 2018

http://www.reportbuyer.com/leisure_media/tourism_travel/travel_tourism_australia_2017.html

Synopsis

The report provides detailed market analysis, information and insights, including:
• Historic and forecast tourist volumes covering the entire Australian travel and tourism sector
• Detailed analysis of tourist spending patterns in Australia for various categories in the travel and tourism sector, such as accommodation, sightseeing and entertainment, foodservice, transportation, retail, travel intermediaries and others
• Detailed market classification across each category, with analysis using similar metrics
• Detailed analysis of the airline, hotel, car rental and travel intermediaries industries

Summary

Under its Tourism 2020 plan, the Australian government considers tourism to be a priority sector. It intends to provide support to key competitors via the state and territory governments to increase the total overnight expenditure to AUD140 billion (US$147 billion) by 2020.

The main components of Tourism 2020 are to expand tourist inflows and expenditure from key Asian markets, build digital capabilities, encourage investment by implementing regulatory reforms and to increase the sector's labor supply. Economic growth will help support government efforts to strengthen the sector. Australia's economy grew at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 4.0% in 2013, the fastest rate of growth since 2007.

Despite a host of challenges, including the appreciation of the Australian dollar and the rising popularity and increasing accessibility of new destinations, the nation's total international arrivals increased by 5.1% in 2013 to reach 6.15 million tourists.

Scope

This report provides an extensive analysis related to tourism demands and flows in Australia:
• It details historical values for the Australian tourism sector for 2009–2013, along with forecast figures for 2014–2018
• It provides comprehensive analysis of travel and tourism demand factors, with values for both the 2009–2013 review period and the 2014–2018 forecast period
• The report provides a detailed analysis and forecast of domestic, inbound and outbound tourist flows in Australia.
• It provides comprehensive analysis of the trends in the airline, hotel, car rental and travel intermediaries industries, with values for both the 2009–2013 review period and the 2014–2018 forecast period.

Reasons To Buy

• Take strategic business decisions using historic and forecast market data related to the Australian travel and tourism sector.
• Understand the demand-side dynamics within the Australian travel and tourism sector, along with key market trends and growth opportunities.

Key Highlights

• Under its Tourism 2020 plan, the Australian government considers tourism to be a priority sector. It intends to provide support to the key competitors via the state and territory governments to increase the total overnight expenditure to AUD140 billion (US$147 billion) by 2020. The main components of Tourism 2020 are to expand tourist inflows and expenditure from key Asian markets, build digital capabilities, encourage investment by implementing regulatory reforms and to increase the sector's labor supply. Despite a host of challenges, including the appreciation of the Australian dollar and the rising popularity and increasing accessibility of new destinations, the country's total international arrivals increased.
• According to the Australian Department of Infrastructure and Transport Statistics, of all of Australia's domestic routes, Melbourne–Sydney was the busiest in 2011–2012 with a 14% share of the total domestic passengers carried. It was followed by Brisbane–Sydney (8%) and Brisbane–Melbourne (5.8%). Of the international routes, Auckland–Sydney was the busiest with a 4.8% share of all international passengers carried. It was followed by Singapore–Sydney (4%) and Singapore–Melbourne (3.7%).
• Tourism Australia, in association with 94 partner organizations which include state and territory governments, developed the 'No Leave, No Life' campaign in 2009 with an investment of AUD4 million (US$3.1 million), in order to promote domestic tourism. The campaign encouraged Australians to use their 123 million days of accrued leave for a domestic holiday. Although Australia's tourism sector benefitted from an economic stimulus package, general economic uncertainty limited domestic tourism expenditure growth. Domestic travel has also been curtailed by extreme weather events such as cyclonic winds, heavy rainfall and forest fires.
China overtook the UK to become Australia's second-largest key source market in 2012. Arrivals from the country are set to continue to grow at a relatively fast pace, with the majority travelling under the Approved Destination Scheme (ADS). This scheme allows Australia to host group tours from China and enables Australian agencies to promote Australia as an attractive tourism destination in China. Recognizing the opportunities that the Asia-Pacific region presents to Australia's tourism sector, the government announced the Asia Marketing Fund in its 2012–2013 budget to increase tourist arrivals and generate higher economic returns from this region.
• The increasing strength of the Australian dollar and continuing weak economic conditions in Europe and the US constrained inbound growth. However, the outlook is somewhat positive, with the Australian dollar set to lose some ground against the US dollar. In addition, growth in domestic tourism has been hampered by the strength of the Australian dollar against other major currencies as it has therefore become increasingly favorable for Australians to take trips abroad.
• Market liberalization in Asia and the formation of a single Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) aviation market by 2015 is opening up opportunities for the expansion and development of new routes. This is resulting in the enhancement of alliance structures with increased connectivity options and expansion by low-cost carriers (LCCs) on short- and long-haul routes.
• The hospitality industry has a shortage of skilled workers. Consequently, the government is taking measures to address the shortage as a part of its national long-term tourism strategy, Tourism 2020. The government plans to attract 56,000 hospitality workers to Australia by 2015.
• Due to the rising number of LLCs, 'Fly-Drive' holidays have become popular in Australia. However, the appreciation of the Australian dollar has made it easier for residents to travel abroad, which has had a negative impact on domestic tourist volumes. This has impacted the business of car rental companies.
• Due to an increase in competition, online travel intermediaries are facing pressure to form and execute growth strategies to gain and maintain customers. For example, Wotif, a hotel-focused company, has expanded into air travel, while Webjet, an airline-focused business, has moved into the hotel market.
Table of Contents
1 Executive Summary
2 Travel and Tourism Sector In Context
3 Country Fact Sheet
4 Tourism Flows
4.1.1 Domestic tourism
4.1.2 Inbound tourism
4.1.3 Outbound tourism
4.2.1 Campaigns to promote domestic tourism
4.2.2 Approved Destination Scheme (ADS)
4.2.3 Consequences of currency fluctuation
4.2.4 Growth in outbound tourism from Australia
4.3.1 Domestic tourism
4.3.2 Inbound tourism
4.3.3 Outbound tourism
5 Airlines
5.2.1 Opportunities for expansion
5.2.2 Virgin expands its operations in Australia
5.2.3 Decline in LCCs share of passenger traffic
5.2.4 Virgin and Qantas war over market share
6 Hotels
6.2.1 Increase in hotel occupancy rates
6.2.2 High cost of accommodation in major cities
6.2.3 Opportunity for skilled workers
6.2.4 Appreciation of Australian dollar
7 Car Rental
8 Travel Intermediaries
8.2.1 Diversification of tourism services
9 Tourism Board Profile
10 Airport Profiles
10.1.1 Overview
10.1.2 Operator profile
10.1.3 Routes
11 Company Profiles – Airlines
11.1.1 Jetstar Airways Pty Ltd – company overview
11.1.2 Jetstar Airways Pty Ltd – main services
11.1.3 Jetstar Airways Pty Ltd – key employees
11.2.1 Virgin Australia Holdings Ltd – company overview
11.2.2 Virgin Australia Holdings Ltd – business description
11.2.3 Virgin Australia Holdings Ltd – main services and brands
11.2.4 Virgin Australia Holdings Ltd – history
11.2.5 Virgin Australia Holdings Ltd – SWOT analysis
11.2.6 Virgin Australia Holdings Ltd – strengths
11.2.7 Virgin Australia Holdings Ltd – weaknesses
11.2.8 Virgin Australia Holdings Ltd – opportunities
11.2.9 Virgin Australia Holdings Ltd – threats
11.2.10 Virgin Australia Holdings Ltd – key employees
11.3.1 Singapore Airlines Australia – company overview
11.3.2 Singapore Airlines Australia – main services
11.3.3 Singapore Airlines Australia – key employees
11.4.1 Tiger Airways Australia Pty Ltd – company overview
11.4.2 Tiger Airways Australia Pty Ltd – main services
11.4.3 Tiger Airways Australia Pty Ltd – key employees
11.5.1 Qantas Airways Ltd – company overview
11.5.2 Qantas Airways Ltd – business description
11.5.3 Qantas Airways Ltd – main services and brands
11.5.4 Qantas Airways Ltd – history
11.5.5 Qantas Airways Ltd – SWOT analysis
11.5.6 Qantas Airways Ltd – strengths
11.5.7 Qantas Airways Ltd – weaknesses
11.5.8 Qantas Airways Ltd – opportunities
11.5.9 Qantas Airways Ltd – threats
11.5.10 Qantas Airways Ltd – key employees
12 Company Profiles – Hotels
12.1.1 Choice Hotels Australasia Pty. Ltd– company overview
12.1.2 Choice Hotels Australasia Pty. Ltd – main services and brands
12.1.3 Choice Hotels Australasia Pty. Ltd– key employees
12.2.1 Accor Hotels Australia– company overview
12.2.2 Accor Hotels Australia– main services
12.2.3 Accor Hotels Australia– key employees
12.3.1 Best Western Australasia– company overview
12.3.2 Best Western Australasia– main services
12.3.3 Best Western Australasia– key employees
12.4.1 Mantra Group – company overview
12.4.2 Mantra Group – main services and brands
12.4.3 Mantra Group – key employees
12.5.1 InterContinental Hotels and Resorts Australia – company overview
12.5.2 InterContinental Hotels and Resorts Australia – main services
12.5.3 InterContinental Hotels and Resorts Australia – key employees
13 Company Profiles – Car Rental
13.1.1 Redspot Sixt Rent a Car – company overview
13.1.2 Redspot Sixt Rent a Car – main services
13.1.3 Redspot Sixt Rent a Car – key employees
13.2.1 Avis Australia – company overview
13.2.2 Avis Australia – main services
13.2.3 Avis Australia – key employees
13.3.1 Hertz Australia Pty Ltd – company overview
13.3.2 Hertz Australia Pty Ltd – main services
13.4.1 Alpha Car Hire Pty Ltd – company overview
13.4.2 Alpha Car Hire Pty Ltd – main services
13.4.3 Alpha Car Hire Pty Ltd – key employees
13.5.1 Budget Rent a Car Australia Pty Ltd – company overview
13.5.2 Budget Rent a Car Australia Pty Ltd – main services
14 Company Profiles – Travel Intermediaries
14.1.1 Stella Travel Services (Australia) Pty Ltd – company overview
14.1.2 Stella Travel Services (Australia) Pty Ltd – main services
14.1.3 Stella Travel Services (Australia) Pty Ltd – key employees
14.2.1 Qantas Holidays Ltd – company overview
14.2.2 Qantas Holidays Ltd – main services
14.2.3 Qantas Holidays Ltd – key employees
14.3.1 STA Travel Pty Ltd – company overview
14.3.2 STA Travel Pty Ltd – main services
14.4.1 travel.com.au Ltd – company overview
14.4.2 travel.com.au Ltd – main services
14.5.1 Flight Centre Ltd – company overview
14.5.2 Flight Centre Ltd – business description
14.5.3 Flight Centre Ltd – main services and brands
14.5.4 Flight Centre Ltd – history
14.5.5 Flight Centre Ltd – SWOT analysis
14.5.6 Flight Centre Ltd – strengths
14.5.7 Flight Centre Ltd – weaknesses
14.5.8 Flight Centre Ltd – opportunities
14.5.9 Flight Centre Ltd – threats
14.5.10 Flight Centre Ltd – key employees
15 Market Data ANALYSIS
15.1.1 Total tourism output
15.1.2 Direct tourism output
15.1.3 Indirect tourism output
15.1.4 Tourism output per employee
15.1.5 Direct tourism output per employee
15.1.6 Indirect tourism output per employee
15.2.1 Total tourism employment
15.2.2 Direct tourism employment
15.2.3 Indirect tourism employment
15.2.4 Tourism employee compensation
15.2.5 Total gross income generated by total tourism employment
15.3.1 Domestic trips by purpose of visit
15.3.2 Number of overnight stays
15.3.3 Total domestic tourist expenditure
15.3.4 Average expenditure per domestic tourist by category
15.4.1 International arrivals by region
15.4.2 International arrivals by purpose of visit
15.4.3 Total inbound tourism expenditure by category
15.4.4 Average international tourist expenditure by category
15.5.1 International departures by region
15.5.2 International departures by purpose of visit
15.5.3 Number of overnight stays
15.5.4 Total outbound tourism expenditure by category
15.5.5 Average outbound expenditure per resident by category
15.6.1 Seats available
15.6.2 Seats sold by carrier type – business travel
15.6.3 Seats sold by carrier type – leisure travel
15.6.4 Load factor by carrier type
15.6.5 Passenger kilometers available by carrier type
15.6.6 Revenue-generating passenger kilometers by carrier type
15.6.7 Revenue per passenger by carrier type
15.6.8 Total revenue by carrier type
15.7.1 Establishments by hotel category
15.7.2 Available rooms by hotel category
15.7.3 Room occupancy rate by hotel category
15.7.4 Room nights available by hotel category
15.7.5 Room nights occupied by hotel category
15.7.6 Average revenue per available room by hotel category
15.7.7 Revenue per occupied room by hotel category
15.7.8 Total revenue per available room by hotel category
15.7.9 Total revenue by hotel category and customer type
15.7.10 Guests by hotel category and customer type
15.8.1 Market value by customer type and rental location
15.8.2 Fleet size
15.8.3 Rental occasions and days
15.8.4 Rental length
15.8.5 Average rental length
15.8.6 Utilization rate
15.8.7 Average revenue per day
15.9.1 Market value by product type
15.9.2 Online revenues by type of intermediary or provider
15.9.3 Online revenues by type of tourist
15.9.4 In-store revenues by type of intermediary
15.9.5 In-store revenues by type of tourist
15.9.6 Travel agent revenues from domestic tourism, by sales channel
15.9.7 Travel agent revenues from international tourism by sales channel
15.9.8 Tour operator revenues from domestic tourism, by sales channel
15.9.9 Tour operator revenues from international tourism, by sales channel
15.9.10 Other intermediaries revenues from domestic tourism, by sales channel
15.9.11 Other intermediaries revenues from international tourism by sales channel
16 Appendix

List of Tables

Table 1: Australia – Tourist Arrivals from Top-10 Countries (Thousand), 2008–2017
Table 2: Australia – Tourist Departures to Top-10 Countries (Thousand), 2008–2017
Table 3: Australia – Leading Hotel Companies (Numbers of Hotels), 2009–2013
Table 4: Tourism Australia – Key Facts and Locations
Table 5: Sydney Kingsford Smith International Airport, Sydney – Overview
Table 6: Melbourne Tullamarine International Airport, Melbourne – Overview
Table 7: Brisbane International Airport, Brisbane – Overview
Table 8: Perth Airport, Perth – Overview
Table 9: Adelaide Airport, Adelaide – Overview
Table 10: Jetstar Airways Pty Ltd, Key Facts
Table 11: Jetstar Airways Pty Ltd, Main Services
Table 12: Jetstar Airways Pty Ltd, Key Employees
Table 13: Virgin Australia Holdings Ltd, Key Facts
Table 14: Virgin Australia Holdings Ltd, Main Services and Brands
Table 15: Virgin Australia Holdings Ltd, History
Table 16: Virgin Australia Holdings Ltd, Key Employees
Table 17: Singapore Airlines Australia, Key Facts
Table 18: Singapore Airlines Australia, Main Services
Table 19: Singapore Airlines Australia, Key Employees
Table 20: Tiger Airways Australia Pty Ltd Key Facts
Table 21: Tiger Airways Australia Pty Ltd, Main Services
Table 22: Tiger Airways Australia Pty Ltd, Key Employees
Table 23: Qantas Airways Ltd, Key Facts
Table 24: Qantas Airways Ltd, Main Services and Brands
Table 25: Qantas Airways Ltd, History
Table 26: Qantas Airways Ltd, Key Employees
Table 27: Choice Hotels Australasia Pty. Ltd, Key Facts
Table 28: Choice Hotels Australasia Pty. Ltd, Main Services and Brands
Table 29: Choice Hotels Australasia Pty. Ltd, Key Employees
Table 30: Accor Hotels Australia, Key Facts
Table 31: Accor Hotels Australia, Main Services
Table 32: Accor Hotels Australia, Key Employees
Table 33: Best Western Australasia, Key Facts
Table 34: Best Western Australasia, Main Services
Table 35: Best Western Australasia, Key Employees
Table 36: Mantra Group, Key Facts
Table 37: Mantra Group, Main Services and Brands
Table 38: Mantra Group, Key Employees
Table 39: InterContinental Hotels and Resorts Australia, Key Facts
Table 40: InterContinental Hotels and Resorts Australia, Main Services
Table 41: InterContinental Hotels and Resorts Australia, Key Employees
Table 42: Redspot Sixt Rent a Car, Key Facts
Table 43: Redspot Sixt Rent a Car, Main Services
Table 44: Redspot Sixt Rent a Car, Key Employees
Table 45: Avis Australia, Key Facts
Table 46: Avis Australia, Main Services
Table 47: Avis Australia, Key Employees
Table 48: Hertz Australia Pty Ltd, Key Facts
Table 49: Hertz Australia Pty Ltd, Main Services
Table 50: Alpha Car Hire Pty Ltd, Key Facts
Table 51: Alpha Car Hire Pty Ltd, Main Services
Table 52: Alpha Car Hire Pty Ltd, Key Employees
Table 53: Budget Rent a Car Australia Pty Ltd, Key Facts
Table 54: Budget Rent a Car Australia Pty Ltd, Main Services
Table 55: Stella Travel Services (Australia) Pty Ltd, Key Facts
Table 56: Stella Travel Services (Australia) Pty Ltd, Main Services
Table 57: Stella Travel Services (Australia) Pty Ltd, Key Employees
Table 58: Qantas Holidays Ltd, Key Facts
Table 59: Qantas Holidays Ltd, Main Services
Table 60: Qantas Holidays Ltd, Key Employees
Table 61: STA Travel Pty Ltd, Key Facts
Table 62: STA Travel Pty Ltd, Main Services
Table 63: travel.com.au Ltd, Key Facts
Table 64: travel.com.au Ltd, Main Services
Table 65: Flight Centre Ltd, Key Facts
Table 66: Flight Centre Ltd, Main Services and Brands
Table 67: Flight Centre Ltd, History
Table 68: Flight Centre Ltd, Key Employees
Table 69: Australia – Total Tourism Output by Category (AUD Billion), 2009–2018
Table 70: Australia – Direct Tourism Output by Category (AUD Billion), 2009–2018
Table 71: Australia – Indirect Tourism Output by Category (AUD Billion), 2009–2018
Table 72: Australia – Total Tourism Output Generated per Employee by Category (AUD Thousand), 2009–2018
Table 73: Australia – Direct Tourism Output Generated per Employee by Category (AUD Thousand), 2009–2018
Table 74: Australia – Indirect Tourism Output Generated per Employee by Category (AUD Thousand), 2009–2018
Table 75: Australia – Total Tourism Employment by Category (Thousand), 2009–2018
Table 76: Australia – Total Tourism Employment as a Percentage of Total Employment by Category (%), 2009–2018
Table 77: Australia – Direct Tourism Employment by Category (Thousand), 2009–2018
Table 78: Australia – Direct Tourism Employment as a Percentage of Total Employment by Category (%), 2009–2018
Table 79: Australia – Indirect Tourism Employment by Category (Thousand), 2009–2018
Table 80: Australia – Indirect Tourism Employment as a Percentage of Total Employment by Category (%), 2009–2018
Table 81: Australia – Average Salary per Employee by Category (AUD Thousand), 2009–2018
Table 82: Australia – Total Gross Income Generated by Total Tourism Employment by Category (AUD Billion), 2009–2018
Table 83: Australia – Number of Trips by Purpose (Million), 2009–2018
Table 84: Australia – Overnight Stays (Million), 2009–2018
Table 85: Australia – Total Domestic Tourism Expenditure by Category (AUD Billion), 2009–2018
Table 86: Australia – Average Expenditure per Domestic Tourist by Category (AUD), 2009–2018
Table 87: Australia – International Arrivals by Region (Thousand), 2009–2018
Table 88: Australia – International Arrivals by Purpose of Visit (Thousand), 2009–2018
Table 89: Australia – Total Inbound Tourism Expenditure by Category (AUD Billion), 2009–2018
Table 90: Australia – Average Expenditure per Inbound Tourist by Category (AUD), 2009–2018
Table 91: Australia – International Departures by Region (Thousand), 2009–2018
Table 92: Australia – International Departures by Purpose of Visit (Thousand), 2009–2018
Table 93: Australia – Overnight Stays (Million), 2009–2018
Table 94: Australia – Total Outbound Tourism Expenditure by Category (AUD Billion), 2009–2018
Table 95: Australia – Average Outbound Expenditure per Resident by Category (AUD), 2009–2018
Table 96: Australia – Seats Available by Carrier Type (Thousand), 2009–2018
Table 97: Australia – Seats Sold by Carrier Type – Business Travel (Thousand), 2009–2018
Table 98: Australia – Seats Sold by Carrier Type – Leisure Travel (Thousand), 2009–2018
Table 99: Australia – Load Factor by Carrier Type (%), 2009–2018
Table 100: Australia – Passenger Kilometers Available by Carrier Type (Million), 2009–2018
Table 101: Australia – Revenue-Generating Passenger Kilometers by Carrier Type (Million), 2009–2018
Table 102: Australia – Revenue per Passenger by Carrier Type (AUD), 2009–2018
Table 103: Australia – Total Revenue by Carrier Type (AUD Million), 2009–2018
Table 104: Australia – Establishments by Category (Actual), 2009–2018
Table 105: Australia – Available Hotel Rooms by Hotel Category (Thousand), 2009–2018
Table 106: Australia – Room Occupancy Rate by Hotel Category (%), 2009–2018
Table 107: Australia – Room Nights Available by Hotel Category (Million), 2009–2018
Table 108: Australia – Room Nights Occupied by Hotel Category (Million), 2009–2018
Table 109: Australia – Average Revenue per Available Room by Hotel Category (AUD), 2009–2018
Table 110: Australia – Revenue per Occupied Room by Hotel Category (AUD), 2009–2018
Table 111: Australia – Total Revenue per Available Room by Hotel Category (AUD), 2009–2018
Table 112: Australia – Total Revenue by Hotel Category and Customer Type (AUD Million), 2009–2018
Table 113: Australia – Guests by Hotel Category and Customer Type (Thousand), 2009–2018
Table 114: Australia – Market Value by Customer Type and Rental Location (AUD Million), 2009–2018
Table 115: Australia – Fleet Size (Actual), 2009–2018
Table 116: Australia – Rental Occasions (Million), 2009–2018
Table 117: Australia – Rental Days (Million), 2009–2018
Table 118: Australia – Average Rental Length (Days), 2009–2018
Table 119: Australia – Market Utilization Rate (%), 2009–2018
Table 120: Australia – Car Rental Average Revenue per Day (AUD), 2009–2018
Table 121: Australia – Travel Intermediaries Market Value by Product Type (AUD Billion), 2009–2018
Table 122: Australia – Travel Intermediaries Online Revenues by Provider (AUD Million), 2009–2018
Table 123: Australia – Travel Intermediaries Online Revenues by Type of Tourist (AUD Million), 2009–2018
Table 124: Australia – Travel Intermediaries In-Store Revenues by Provider (AUD Million), 2009–2018
Table 125: Australia – Travel Intermediaries In-Store Revenues by Type of Tourist (AUD Million), 2009–2018
Table 126: Australia – Travel Agent Revenues from Domestic Tourism by Sales Channel (AUD Million), 2009–2018
Table 127: Australia – Travel Agent Revenues from International Tourism by Sales Channel (AUD Million), 2009–2018
Table 128: Australia – Tour Operator Revenues from Domestic Tourism by Sales Channel (AUD Million), 2009–2018
Table 129: Australia – Tour Operator Revenues from International Tourism by Sales Channel (AUD Million), 2009–2018
Table 130: Australia – Other Intermediaries Revenues from Domestic Tourism by Sales Channel (AUD Million), 2009–2018
Table 131: Australia – Other Intermediaries Revenues from International Tourism by Sales Channel (AUD Million), 2009–2018
Table 132: Timetric Travel and Tourism Sector Definitions



List of Figures
Figure 1: Australia – Tourism Expenditure (US$ Million), 2009–2018
Figure 2: Australia – Key Ratios (%), 2009–2018
Figure 3: Australia – Domestic Tourism Expenditure (AUD Million), 2009–2018
Figure 4: Australia – International Arrivals by Purpose of Visit (Thousand), 2009–2018
Figure 5: Australia – International Departures by Purpose of Visit (Thousand), 2009–2018
Figure 6: Australia – Number of Trips by Purpose (Million), 2009–2018
Figure 7: Australia – Average Expenditure per Inbound Tourist by Category (AUD), 2009–2018
Figure 8: Australia – Load Factor (%) and Revenue per Passenger (AUD), 2009–2018
Figure 9: Australia – Leading Airlines by Passengers Carried (%), 2012 and 2013
Figure 10: Australia – Seats Available by Carrier Type (Thousand), 2009–2018
Figure 11: Australia – Revenue per Occupied Room (AUD), 2009–2018
Figure 12: Australia – Room Occupancy Rate by Hotel Category (%), 2009–2018
Figure 13: Australia – Total Hotel Revenue (AUD Million), 2009–2018
Figure 14: Australia – Car Rental Value by Rental Type and Location (AUD Million), 2009–2018
Figure 15: Australia – Average Revenue per Day (AUD), 2009–2018
Figure 16: Australia – Travel Intermediaries Market Value by Product Type (AUD Billion), 2009–2018
Figure 17: Australia – Travel Intermediaries Market Value by Product (AUD Million), 2009–2018
Figure 18: Australia – Total Tourism Output by Category (AUD Billion), 2009–2018
Figure 19: Australia – Direct Tourism Output by Category (AUD Billion), 2009–2018
Figure 20: Australia – Indirect Tourism Output by Category (AUD Billion), 2009–2018
Figure 21: Australia – Total Tourism Output Generated per Employee by Category (AUD Thousand), 2009–2018
Figure 22: Australia – Direct Tourism Output Generated per Employee by Category (AUD Thousand), 2009–2018
Figure 23: Australia – Indirect Tourism Output Generated per Employee by Category (AUD Thousand), 2009–2018
Figure 24: Australia – Total Tourism Employment by Category (Thousand), 2009–2018
Figure 25: Australia – Direct Tourism Employment by Category (Thousand), 2009–2018
Figure 26: Australia – Indirect Tourism Employment by Category (Thousand), 2009–2018
Figure 27: Australia – Average Salary per Employee by Category (AUD Thousand), 2009–2018
Figure 28: Australia – Total Gross Income Generated by Total Tourism Employment by Category (AUD Billion), 2009–2018
Figure 29: Australia – Number of Trips by Purpose (Million), 2009–2018
Figure 30: Australia – Overnight Stays (Million), 2009–2018
Figure 31: Australia – Total Domestic Tourism Expenditure by Category (AUD Billion), 2009–2018
Figure 32: Australia – Average Expenditure per Domestic Tourist by Category (AUD), 2009–2018
Figure 33: Australia – International Arrivals by Region (Thousand), 2009–2018
Figure 34: Australia – International Arrivals by Purpose of Visit (Thousand), 2009–2018
Figure 35: Australia – Total Inbound Tourism Expenditure by Category (AUD Billion), 2009–2018
Figure 36: Australia – Average Expenditure per Inbound Tourist by Category (AUD), 2009–2018
Figure 37: Australia – International Departures by Region (Thousand), 2009–2018
Figure 38: Australia – International Departures by Purpose of Visit (Thousand), 2009–2018
Figure 39: Australia – Overnight Stays (Million), 2009–2018
Figure 40: Australia – Total Outbound Tourism Expenditure by Category (AUD Billion), 2009–2018
Figure 41: Australia – Average Outbound Expenditure per Resident by Category (AUD), 2009–2018
Figure 42: Australia – Seats Available by Carrier Type (Thousand), 2009–2018
Figure 43: Australia – Seats Sold by Carrier Type – Business Travel (Thousand), 2009–2018
Figure 44: Australia – Seats Sold by Carrier Type – Leisure Travel (Thousand), 2009–2018
Figure 45: Australia – Load Factor by Carrier Type (%), 2009–2018
Figure 46: Australia – Passenger Kilometers Available by Carrier Type (Million), 2009–2018
Figure 47: Australia – Revenue-Generating Passenger Kilometers by Carrier Type (Million), 2009–2018
Figure 48: Australia – Revenue per Passenger by Carrier Type (AUD), 2009–2018
Figure 49: Australia – Total Revenue by Carrier Type (AUD Million), 2009–2018
Figure 50: Australia – Establishments by Category (Actual), 2009–2018
Figure 51: Australia – Available Hotel Rooms by Hotel Category (Thousand), 2009–2018
Figure 52: Australia – Room Occupancy Rate by Hotel Category (%), 2009–2018
Figure 53: Australia – Room Nights Available by Hotel Category (Million), 2009–2018
Figure 54: Australia – Room Nights Occupied by Hotel Category (Million), 2009–2018
Figure 55: Australia – Average Revenue per Available Room by Hotel Category (AUD), 2009–2018
Figure 56: Australia – Revenue per Occupied Room by Hotel Category (AUD), 2009–2018
Figure 57: Australia – Total Revenue per Available Room by Hotel Category (AUD), 2009–2018
Figure 58: Australia – Total Revenue by Hotel Category (AUD Million), 2009–2018
Figure 59: Australia – Guests by Hotel Category (Thousand), 2009–2018
Figure 60: Australia – Market Value by Customer Type and Rental Location (AUD Million), 2009–2018
Figure 61: Australia – Fleet Size (Actual), 2009–2018
Figure 62: Australia – Rental Occasions (Million), 2009–2018
Figure 63: Australia – Rental Days (Million), vs Average Rental Length (Days), 2009–2018
Figure 64: Australia – Market Utilization Rate (%), 2009–2018
Figure 65: Australia – Car Rental Average Revenue per Day (AUD), 2009–2018
Figure 66: Australia – Travel Intermediaries Market Value by Product Type (AUD Billion), 2009–2018
Figure 67: Australia – Travel Intermediaries Online Revenues by Provider (AUD Million), 2009–2018
Figure 68: Australia – Travel Intermediaries Online Revenues by Type of Tourist (AUD Million), 2009–2018
Figure 69: Australia – Travel Intermediaries In-Store Revenues by Provider (AUD Million), 2009–2018
Figure 70: Australia – Travel Intermediaries In-Store Revenues by Type of Tourist (AUD Million), 2009–2018
Figure 71: Australia – Travel Agent Revenues from Domestic Tourism by Sales Channel (AUD Million), 2009–2018
Figure 72: Australia – Travel Agent Revenues from International Tourism by Sales Channel (AUD Million), 2009–2018
Figure 73: Australia – Tour Operator Revenues from Domestic Tourism by Sales Channel (AUD Million), 2009–2018
Figure 74: Australia – Tour Operator Revenues from International Tourism by Sales Channel (AUD Million), 2009–2018
Figure 75: Australia – Other Intermediaries Revenues from Domestic Tourism by Sales Channel (AUD Million), 2009–2018
Figure 76: Australia – Other Intermediaries Revenues from International Tourism by Sales Channel (AUD Million), 2009–2018




Read the full report:
Travel and Tourism in Australia to 2018

http://www.reportbuyer.com/leisure_media/tourism_travel/travel_tourism_australia_2017.html

For more information:
Sarah Smith
Research Advisor at Reportbuyer.com
Email: [email protected]
Tel: +44 208 816 85 48
Website: www.reportbuyer.com

 

 

SOURCE ReportBuyer

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"We've just seen a huge influx of new partners coming into our ecosystem, and partners building unique offerings on top of our API set," explained Seth Bostock, Chief Executive Officer at IndependenceIT, in this SYS-CON.tv interview at 16th Cloud Expo, held June 9-11, 2015, at the Javits Center in New York City.
Mobile, social, Big Data, and cloud have fundamentally changed the way we live. “Anytime, anywhere” access to data and information is no longer a luxury; it’s a requirement, in both our personal and professional lives. For IT organizations, this means pressure has never been greater to deliver meaningful services to the business and customers.
Digital Transformation is the ultimate goal of cloud computing and related initiatives. The phrase is certainly not a precise one, and as subject to hand-waving and distortion as any high-falutin' terminology in the world of information technology. Yet it is an excellent choice of words to describe what enterprise IT—and by extension, organizations in general—should be working to achieve. Digital Transformation means: handling all the data types being found and created in the organizat...
SYS-CON Events announced today that HPM Networks will exhibit at the 17th International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on November 3–5, 2015, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. For 20 years, HPM Networks has been integrating technology solutions that solve complex business challenges. HPM Networks has designed solutions for both SMB and enterprise customers throughout the San Francisco Bay Area.
Chuck Piluso presented a study of cloud adoption trends and the power and flexibility of IBM Power and Pureflex cloud solutions. Prior to Secure Infrastructure and Services, Mr. Piluso founded North American Telecommunication Corporation, a facilities-based Competitive Local Exchange Carrier licensed by the Public Service Commission in 10 states, serving as the company's chairman and president from 1997 to 2000. Between 1990 and 1997, Mr. Piluso served as chairman & founder of International Te...
The Software Defined Data Center (SDDC), which enables organizations to seamlessly run in a hybrid cloud model (public + private cloud), is here to stay. IDC estimates that the software-defined networking market will be valued at $3.7 billion by 2016. Security is a key component and benefit of the SDDC, and offers an opportunity to build security 'from the ground up' and weave it into the environment from day one. In his session at 16th Cloud Expo, Reuven Harrison, CTO and Co-Founder of Tufin,...
Container technology is sending shock waves through the world of cloud computing. Heralded as the 'next big thing,' containers provide software owners a consistent way to package their software and dependencies while infrastructure operators benefit from a standard way to deploy and run them. Containers present new challenges for tracking usage due to their dynamic nature. They can also be deployed to bare metal, virtual machines and various cloud platforms. How do software owners track the usag...
SYS-CON Events announced today that MobiDev, a software development company, will exhibit at the 17th International Cloud Expo®, which will take place November 3–5, 2015, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. MobiDev is a software development company with representative offices in Atlanta (US), Sheffield (UK) and Würzburg (Germany); and development centers in Ukraine. Since 2009 it has grown from a small group of passionate engineers and business managers to a full-scale mobi...
With SaaS use rampant across organizations, how can IT departments track company data and maintain security? More and more departments are commissioning their own solutions and bypassing IT. A cloud environment is amorphous and powerful, allowing you to set up solutions for all of your user needs: document sharing and collaboration, mobile access, e-mail, even industry-specific applications. In his session at 16th Cloud Expo, Shawn Mills, President and a founder of Green House Data, discussed h...
For IoT to grow as quickly as analyst firms’ project, a lot is going to fall on developers to quickly bring applications to market. But the lack of a standard development platform threatens to slow growth and make application development more time consuming and costly, much like we’ve seen in the mobile space. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Mike Weiner, Product Manager of the Omega DevCloud with KORE Telematics Inc., discussed the evolving requirements for developers as IoT matures and conducte...
There are many considerations when moving applications from on-premise to cloud. It is critical to understand the benefits and also challenges of this migration. A successful migration will result in lower Total Cost of Ownership, yet offer the same or higher level of robustness. In his session at 15th Cloud Expo, Michael Meiner, an Engineering Director at Oracle, Corporation, analyzed a range of cloud offerings (IaaS, PaaS, SaaS) and discussed the benefits/challenges of migrating to each offe...
One of the hottest areas in cloud right now is DRaaS and related offerings. In his session at 16th Cloud Expo, Dale Levesque, Disaster Recovery Product Manager with Windstream's Cloud and Data Center Marketing team, will discuss the benefits of the cloud model, which far outweigh the traditional approach, and how enterprises need to ensure that their needs are properly being met.
In their session at 17th Cloud Expo, Hal Schwartz, CEO of Secure Infrastructure & Services (SIAS), and Chuck Paolillo, CTO of Secure Infrastructure & Services (SIAS), provide a study of cloud adoption trends and the power and flexibility of IBM Power and Pureflex cloud solutions. In his role as CEO of Secure Infrastructure & Services (SIAS), Hal Schwartz provides leadership and direction for the company.
In a recent research, analyst firm IDC found that the average cost of a critical application failure is $500,000 to $1 million per hour and the average total cost of unplanned application downtime is $1.25 billion to $2.5 billion per year for Fortune 1000 companies. In addition to the findings on the cost of the downtime, the research also highlighted best practices for development, testing, application support, infrastructure, and operations teams.
The Internet of Everything (IoE) brings together people, process, data and things to make networked connections more relevant and valuable than ever before – transforming information into knowledge and knowledge into wisdom. IoE creates new capabilities, richer experiences, and unprecedented opportunities to improve business and government operations, decision making and mission support capabilities.