Welcome!

News Feed Item

Cancer Monoclonal Antibody Partnering Terms and Agreements



 

 

 

LONDON, Aug. 27, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Reportbuyer.com has added a new market research report:

Cancer Monoclonal Antibody Partnering Terms and Agreements

https://www.reportbuyer.com/product/1112622/Cancer-Monoclonal-Antibody-Partnering-Terms-and-Agreements.html

The Cancer Monoclonal Antibody Partnering Agreements report provides an understanding and access to the cancer monoclonal antibody partnering deals and agreements entered into by the worlds leading healthcare companies.


Trends in cancer monoclonal antibody partnering deals
Disclosed headlines, upfronts, milestones and royalties by stage of development
Cancer monoclonal antibody partnering contract documents
Top cancer monoclonal antibody deals by value

The Cancer Monoclonal Antibody Partnering Agreements report provides an understanding and access to the cancer monoclonal antibody partnering deals and agreements entered into by the worlds leading healthcare companies.

The report provides an understanding and analysis of how and why companies enter cancer monoclonal antibody partnering deals. The majority of deals are discovery or development stage whereby the licensee obtains a right or an option right to license the licensors monoclonal antibody technology. These deals tend to be multicomponent, starting with collaborative R&D, and commercialization of outcomes. The report also includes antibody-drug conjugate deals and alliances.

Understanding the flexibility of a prospective partner's negotiated deals terms provides critical insight into the negotiation process in terms of what you can expect to achieve during the negotiation of terms. Whilst many smaller companies will be seeking details of the payments clauses, the devil is in the detail in terms of how payments are triggered – contract documents provide this insight where press releases do not.

This report contains over 350 links to online copies of actual cancer monoclonal antibody deals and where available, contract documents as submitted to the Securities Exchange Commission by companies and their partners. Contract documents provide the answers to numerous questions about a prospective partner's flexibility on a wide range of important issues, many of which will have a significant impact on each party's ability to derive value from the deal.

The initial chapters of this report provide an orientation of cancer monoclonal antibody dealmaking and business activities. Chapter 1 provides an introduction to the report, whilst chapter 2 provides an overview of the trends in cancer monoclonal antibody dealmaking since 2009, including details of average headline, upfront, milestone and royalty terms.

Chapter 3 provides a review of the leading cancer monoclonal antibody deals since 2009. Deals are listed by headline value, signed by big pharma, big biotech and most active of all biopharma companies. Where the deal has an agreement contract published at the SEC a link provides online access to the contract
.
Chapter 4 provides a comprehensive listing of the top 50 big pharma companies with deal announcement in cancer monoclonal antibody partnering, along with a brief summary followed by a comprehensive listing of cancer monoclonal antibody deals, as well as contract documents available in the public domain. Where available, each deal title links via Weblink to an online version of the actual contract document, providing easy access to each contract document on demand.

Chapter 5 provides a comprehensive listing of the top 50 big biotech companies with deal announcement in cancer monoclonal antibody partnering, along with a brief summary followed by a comprehensive listing of cancer monoclonal antibody deals, as well as contract documents available in the public domain. Where available, each deal title links via Weblink to an online version of the actual contract document, providing easy access to each contract document on demand.

Chapter 6 provides a comprehensive and detailed review of cancer monoclonal antibody partnering deals signed and announced since January 2009. The chapter is organized by company A-Z, stage of development at signing, deal type (collaborative R&D, co-promotion, licensing etc), specific therapy focus, and monoclonal antibody technology type. Each deal title links via Weblink to an online version of the deal record and where available, the contract document, providing easy access to each contract document on demand.

The report also includes numerous tables and figures that illustrate the trends and activities in cancer monoclonal antibody partnering and dealmaking since 2009.

In conclusion, this report provides everything a prospective dealmaker needs to know about partnering in the research, development and commercialization of cancer monoclonal antibody technologies and products.


Report scope

Cancer Monoclonal Antibody Partnering Agreements is intended to provide the reader with an in-depth understanding and access to cancer monoclonal antibody trends and structure of deals entered into by leading companies worldwide.


Cancer Monoclonal Antibody Partnering Agreements includes:

Trends in cancer monoclonal antibody dealmaking in the biopharma industry since 2009
Analysis of cancer monoclonal antibody deal structure
Access to headline, upfront, milestone and royalty data
Access to over 300 cancer monoclonal antibody deal records
The leading cancer monoclonal antibody deals by value since 2009


In Cancer Monoclonal Antibody Partnering Agreements, the available deals are listed by:

Company A-Z
Headline value
Stage of development at signing
Deal component type
Specific oncology therapy target
Monoclonal antibody type

Each deal title links via Weblink to an online version of the deal record and where available, the contract document, providing easy access to each contract document on demand.

The Cancer Monoclonal Antibody Partnering Agreements report provides comprehensive access to available deals and contract documents for over 300 cancer monoclonal antibody deals. Analyzing actual contract agreements allows assessment of the following:

What are the precise rights granted or optioned?
What is actually granted by the agreement to the partner company?
What exclusivity is granted?
What is the payment structure for the deal?
How aresales and payments audited?
What is the deal term?
How are the key terms of the agreement defined?
How are IPRs handled and owned?
Who is responsible for commercialization?
Who is responsible for development, supply, and manufacture?
How is confidentiality and publication managed?
How are disputes to be resolved?
Under what conditions can the deal be terminated?
What happens when there is a change of ownership?
What sublicensing and subcontracting provisions have been agreed?
Which boilerplate clauses does the company insist upon?
Which boilerplate clauses appear to differ from partner to partner or deal type to deal type?
Which jurisdiction does the company insist upon for agreement law?
Executive Summary


Chapter 1 – Introduction

Chapter 2 – Trends in cancer monoclonal antibody dealmaking

2.1. Introduction
2.2. Cancer monoclonal antibody partnering over the years
2.3. Big pharma cancer monoclonal antibody dealmaking activity
2.4. Big biotech cancer monoclonal antibody dealmaking activity
2.5. Most active in cancer monoclonal antibody partnering
2.6. Cancer monoclonal antibody partnering by deal type
2.7. Cancer monoclonal antibody partnering by stage of development
2.8. Cancer monoclonal antibody partnering by cancer indication
2.9. Cancer monoclonal antibody partnering by antibody type
2.10. Disclosed deal terms for cancer monoclonal antibody partnering
2.10.1 Cancer monoclonal antibody partnering headline values
2.10.2 Cancer monoclonal antibody deal upfront payments
2.10.3 Cancer monoclonal antibody deal milestone payments
2.10.4 Cancer monoclonal antibody royalty rates

Chapter 3 – Leading cancer monoclonal antibody deals

3.1. Introduction
3.2. Top cancer monoclonal antibody deals by value

Chapter 4 – Big pharma cancer monoclonal antibody deals

4.1. Introduction

4.2. How to use big pharma partnering deals

4.3. Big pharma cancer monoclonal antibody partnering company profiles

Abbott
Abbvie
Actavis (formerly called Watson)
Amgen
Astellas
AstraZeneca
Bayer
Biogen Idec
Boehringer Ingelheim
Bristol-Myers Squibb
Celgene
Chugai Pharmaceutical
CSL
Daiichi Sankyo
Eli Lilly
Fresenius
Gilead Sciences
GlaxoSmithKline
Johnson & Johnson
Merck & Co
Merck KGaA
Mitsubishi Tanabe
Novartis
Novo Nordisk
Otsuka
Pfizer
Roche
Sanofi
Servier
Takeda
Teva
UCB
Chapter 5 – Big biotech cancer monoclonal antibody deals

5.1. Introduction

5.2. How to use big biotech partnering deals

5.3. Big biotech cancer monoclonal antibody partnering company profiles

Emergent BioSolutions
Genmab
LFB Group
Morphosys
PDL BioPharma
Seattle Genetics
Spectrum Pharmaceuticals
Swedish Orphan Biovitrum

Chapter 6 – Cancer monoclonal antibody dealmaking directory

6.1. Introduction

6.2. Company A-Z

6.3. By stage of development

Discovery
Formulation
Marketed
Phase I
Phase II
Phase III
Preclinical
Regulatory

6.4. By deal type

Asset purchase
Assignment
Bigpharma outlicensing
Co-development
Collaborative R&D
Co-market
Contract service
Co-promotion
CRADA
Cross-licensing
Development
Distribution
Equity purchase
Evaluation
Grant
Joint venture
Licensing
Loan
Manufacturing
Marketing
Material transfer
Option
Promotion
Research
Settlement
Spin out
Sub-license
Supply
Technology transfer
Termination

6.5. By oncology therapy area

Oncology
Bone cancer
Brain cancer
Breast cancer
Colorectal cancer
Gastric cancer
Head and neck cancer
Kidney cancer
Leukemia
Acute lymphoblastic leukemia
Acute myelogenous leukemia
Chronic lymphocytic leukemia
Lung cancer
Non small cell lung cancer
Lymphoma
Hodgkin's lymphoma
Non Hodgkin's lymphoma
Melanoma
Metastases
Multiple myeloma
Neuroblastoma
Ovarian cancer
Pancreatic cancer
Prostate cancer
Renal cell carcinoma
Solid tumors
Cancer pain
Thyroid cancer
6.6. By monoclonal antibody type
Chapter 7 –Partnering resource center
7.1. Online partnering
7.2. Partnering events
7.3. Further reading on dealmaking
Appendices
Appendix 1 – Deal type definitions
Appendix 2 – Example monoclonal antibody cancer partnering agreement
About Wildwood Ventures
Current Partnering
Current Agreements
Recent report titles from CurrentPartnering
Order Form – Upgrades for subscription access products
Order Form – Therapy Reports
Order Form – Technology Reports

Table of figures

Figure 1: Cancer monoclonal antibody partnering since 2009
Figure 2: Big pharma – top 50 – cancer monoclonal antibody deals 2009 to 2014
Figure 3: Big pharma cancer monoclonal antibody deal frequency – 2009 to 2014
Figure 4: Big biotech – top 50 – cancer monoclonal antibody deals 2009 to 2014
Figure 5: Big biotech cancer monoclonal antibody deal frequency – 2009 to 2014
Figure 6: Active cancer monoclonal antibody dealmaking activity– 2009 to 2014
Figure 7: Cancer monoclonal antibody partnering by deal type since 2009
Figure 8: Cancer monoclonal antibody partnering by stage of development since 2009
Figure 9: Monoclonal antibody partnering by oncology target since 2009
Figure 10: Monoclonal antibody partnering by type since 2009
Figure 11: Cancer monoclonal antibody deals with a headline value – by stage of development
Figure 12: Cancer monoclonal antibody deal headline value distribution, US$million – discovery stage
Figure 13: Cancer monoclonal antibody deal headline value distribution, US$million – preclinical stage
Figure 14: Cancer monoclonal antibody deal headline value distribution, US$million – phase I stage
Figure 15: Cancer monoclonal antibody deal headline value distribution, US$million – phase II stage
Figure 16: Cancer monoclonal antibody deal headline value distribution, US$million – phase III stage
Figure 17: Cancer monoclonal antibody deal headline value distribution, US$million – regulatory stage
Figure 18: Cancer monoclonal antibody deal headline value distribution, US$million – marketed stage
Figure 19: Cancer monoclonal antibody deal headline value – median value by stage of development
Figure 20: Cancer monoclonal antibody deals with upfront payment values – by stage of development
Figure 21: Cancer monoclonal antibody deal upfront distribution, US$million – discovery stage
Figure 22: Cancer monoclonal antibody deal upfront value distribution, US$million – preclinical stage
Figure 23: Cancer monoclonal antibody deal upfront value distribution, US$million – phase I stage
Figure 24: Cancer monoclonal antibody deal upfront value distribution, US$million – phase II stage
Figure 25: Cancer monoclonal antibody deal upfront value distribution, US$million – phase III stage
Figure 26: Cancer monoclonal antibody deal upfront value distribution, US$million – regulatory stage
Figure 27: Cancer monoclonal antibody deal upfront value distribution, US$million – marketed stage
Figure 28: Cancer monoclonal antibody deal upfront value – median value by stage of development
Figure 29: Cancer monoclonal antibody deals with milestone payment – by stage of development
Figure 30: Cancer monoclonal antibody deal milestone distribution, US$million – discovery stage
Figure 31: Cancer monoclonal antibody deal milestone value distribution, US$million – preclinical stage
Figure 32: Cancer monoclonal antibody deal milestone value distribution, US$million – phase I stage
Figure 33: Cancer monoclonal antibody deal milestone value distribution, US$million – phase II stage
Figure 34: Cancer monoclonal antibody deal milestone value distribution, US$million – phase III stage
Figure 35: Cancer monoclonal antibody deal milestone value distribution, US$million – regulatory stage
Figure 36: Cancer monoclonal antibody deal milestone value distribution, US$million – marketed stage
Figure 37: Cancer monoclonal antibody deals with royalty rates
Figure 38: Cancer monoclonal antibody deal royalty rate distribution, US$million – discovery stage
Figure 39: Cancer monoclonal antibody deal royalty rate value distribution, US$million – preclinical stage
Figure 40: Cancer monoclonal antibody deal royalty rate value distribution, US$million – phase I stage
Figure 41: Cancer monoclonal antibody deal royalty rate value distribution, US$million – phase II stage
Figure 42: Cancer monoclonal antibody deal royalty rate value distribution, US$million – phase III stage
Figure 43: Cancer monoclonal antibody deal royalty rate value distribution, US$million – regulatory stage
Figure 44: Cance monoclonal antibody deal royalty rate value distribution, US$million – marketed stage
Figure 45: Cancer monoclonal antibody deal royalty value – median value by stage of development
Figure 46: Top cancer monoclonal antibody deals by value since 2009
Figure 47: Online partnering resources
Figure 48: Forthcoming partnering events
Figure 49: Deal type definitions
Figure 50: Collaborative R&D agreement for BiTE antibodies against three undisclosed solid tumor targets



Read the full report:
Cancer Monoclonal Antibody Partnering Terms and Agreements

https://www.reportbuyer.com/product/1112622/Cancer-Monoclonal-Antibody-Partnering-Terms-and-Agreements.html

For more information:
Sarah Smith
Research Advisor at Reportbuyer.com
Email: [email protected]
Tel: +44 208 816 85 48
Website: www.reportbuyer.com

SOURCE ReportBuyer

More Stories By PR Newswire

Copyright © 2007 PR Newswire. All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of PRNewswire content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of PRNewswire. PRNewswire shall not be liable for any errors or delays in the content, or for any actions taken in reliance thereon.

Latest Stories
Cloud applications are seeing a deluge of requests to support the exploding advanced analytics market. “Open analytics” is the emerging strategy to deliver that data through an open data access layer, in the cloud, to be directly consumed by external analytics tools and popular programming languages. An increasing number of data engineers and data scientists use a variety of platforms and advanced analytics languages such as SAS, R, Python and Java, as well as frameworks such as Hadoop and Spark...
"When we talk about cloud without compromise what we're talking about is that when people think about 'I need the flexibility of the cloud' - it's the ability to create applications and run them in a cloud environment that's far more flexible,” explained Matthew Finnie, CTO of Interoute, in this SYS-CON.tv interview at 20th Cloud Expo, held June 6-8, 2017, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY.
The Internet giants are fully embracing AI. All the services they offer to their customers are aimed at drawing a map of the world with the data they get. The AIs from these companies are used to build disruptive approaches that cannot be used by established enterprises, which are threatened by these disruptions. However, most leaders underestimate the effect this will have on their businesses. In his session at 21st Cloud Expo, Rene Buest, Director Market Research & Technology Evangelism at Ara...
Join us at Cloud Expo June 6-8 to find out how to securely connect your cloud app to any cloud or on-premises data source – without complex firewall changes. More users are demanding access to on-premises data from their cloud applications. It’s no longer a “nice-to-have” but an important differentiator that drives competitive advantages. It’s the new “must have” in the hybrid era. Users want capabilities that give them a unified view of the data to get closer to customers and grow business. The...
"We are a monitoring company. We work with Salesforce, BBC, and quite a few other big logos. We basically provide monitoring for them, structure for their cloud services and we fit into the DevOps world" explained David Gildeh, Co-founder and CEO of Outlyer, in this SYS-CON.tv interview at DevOps Summit at 20th Cloud Expo, held June 6-8, 2017, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY.
The current age of digital transformation means that IT organizations must adapt their toolset to cover all digital experiences, beyond just the end users’. Today’s businesses can no longer focus solely on the digital interactions they manage with employees or customers; they must now contend with non-traditional factors. Whether it's the power of brand to make or break a company, the need to monitor across all locations 24/7, or the ability to proactively resolve issues, companies must adapt to...
"Loom is applying artificial intelligence and machine learning into the entire log analysis process, from start to finish and at the end you will get a human touch,” explained Sabo Taylor Diab, Vice President, Marketing at Loom Systems, in this SYS-CON.tv interview at 20th Cloud Expo, held June 6-8, 2017, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY.
After more than five years of DevOps, definitions are evolving, boundaries are expanding, ‘unicorns’ are no longer rare, enterprises are on board, and pundits are moving on. Can we now look at an evolution of DevOps? Should we? Is the foundation of DevOps ‘done’, or is there still too much left to do? What is mature, and what is still missing? What does the next 5 years of DevOps look like? In this Power Panel at DevOps Summit, moderated by DevOps Summit Conference Chair Andi Mann, panelists loo...
"Tintri focuses on the Ops side of the DevOps, which basically is pushing more and more of the accessibility of the infrastructure to the developers and trying to get behind the scenes," explained Dhiraj Sehgal of Tintri in this SYS-CON.tv interview at 20th Cloud Expo, held June 6-8, 2017, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY.
@DevOpsSummit at Cloud Expo taking place Oct 31 - Nov 2, 2017, at the Santa Clara Convention Center, Santa Clara, CA, is co-located with the 21st International Cloud Expo and will feature technical sessions from a rock star conference faculty and the leading industry players in the world. The widespread success of cloud computing is driving the DevOps revolution in enterprise IT. Now as never before, development teams must communicate and collaborate in a dynamic, 24/7/365 environment. There is ...
You know you need the cloud, but you’re hesitant to simply dump everything at Amazon since you know that not all workloads are suitable for cloud. You know that you want the kind of ease of use and scalability that you get with public cloud, but your applications are architected in a way that makes the public cloud a non-starter. You’re looking at private cloud solutions based on hyperconverged infrastructure, but you’re concerned with the limits inherent in those technologies.
In the world of DevOps there are ‘known good practices’ – aka ‘patterns’ – and ‘known bad practices’ – aka ‘anti-patterns.' Many of these patterns and anti-patterns have been developed from real world experience, especially by the early adopters of DevOps theory; but many are more feasible in theory than in practice, especially for more recent entrants to the DevOps scene. In this power panel at @DevOpsSummit at 18th Cloud Expo, moderated by DevOps Conference Chair Andi Mann, panelists discussed...
A look across the tech landscape at the disruptive technologies that are increasing in prominence and speculate as to which will be most impactful for communications – namely, AI and Cloud Computing. In his session at 20th Cloud Expo, Curtis Peterson, VP of Operations at RingCentral, highlighted the current challenges of these transformative technologies and shared strategies for preparing your organization for these changes. This “view from the top” outlined the latest trends and developments i...
The current age of digital transformation means that IT organizations must adapt their toolset to cover all digital experiences, beyond just the end users’. Today’s businesses can no longer focus solely on the digital interactions they manage with employees or customers; they must now contend with non-traditional factors. Whether it's the power of brand to make or break a company, the need to monitor across all locations 24/7, or the ability to proactively resolve issues, companies must adapt to...
"We focus on composable infrastructure. Composable infrastructure has been named by companies like Gartner as the evolution of the IT infrastructure where everything is now driven by software," explained Bruno Andrade, CEO and Founder of HTBase, in this SYS-CON.tv interview at 20th Cloud Expo, held June 6-8, 2017, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY.