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Sports-Related Employment Is on the Rise and Creating Jobs in Other Industries, According to New Research from CareerBuilder and Economic Modeling Specialists

CHICAGO, Aug. 28, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- With football season right around the corner, excitement is building in cities across the country. But aside from preseason scores or how individual players are performing, one of the most interesting stats to follow is how sports impact the job market.

CareerBuilder and Economic Modeling Specialists Intl (EMSI) took a look at post-recession job growth in the six largest sports-related industries in the United States1. Combined, jobs in sports-related industries have increased by 12.6 percent between 2010 and 2014, while the overall national job market grew by 5.5 percent. The average earnings in these combined sports-related industries ($78,455) are significantly higher than the national average ($57,947).

Moreover, sports jobs have a high multiplier effect, meaning they create more jobs in other occupations and industries. For instance: 100 new jobs in Sports Teams and Clubs in Pittsburgh can lead to $46.2 million new earnings across the city and 422 additional jobs outside of the industry in areas such as construction, health care, sales, food preparation and maintenance.

Industry Growth
On the national level, much of the growth in sports-related jobs has been on the business end, with the Promoters of Performing Arts, Sports, and Similar Events growing by 30 percent between 2010 and 2014, followed by Agents and Managers for Artists, Athletes, Entertainers, and Other Public Figures, which grew by 17 percent.

 

Industry

2010 Jobs

2014 Jobs

Growth

% Growth

Sports Teams and Clubs

76,411

82,968

6,557

8.6%

Promoters of Performing Arts, Sports, and
Similar Events with Facilities

76,269

99,445

23,176

30.4%

Other Spectator Sports2

54,545

53,538

(1,007)

(1.8%)

Racetracks

44,672

40,712

(3,960)

(8.9%)

Promoters of Performing Arts, Sports, and
Similar Events without Facilities

31,481

41,091

9,610

30.5%

Agents and Managers for Artists, Athletes,
Entertainers, and Other Public Figures

30,748

35,899

5,151

16.8%

Total

314,125

353,654

39,529

12.6%

 

Occupational Breakdown
Athletes and coaches aren't the only occupations supported by the sports industry. From event planners and ushers to broadcast announcers and marketing professionals, several occupations have experienced double-digit employment growth post-recession in the above sports-related industries.

 

Occupation

Employed in
Sports-
Related
Industries
(2010)

Employed
in Sports-
Related
Industries
(2014)

Change
(2010 -
2014)

%
Change
(2010 -
2014)

Meeting, Convention, and Event Planners

3,685

5,136

1,451

39%

Concierges

1,071

1,462

391

37%

Audio and Video Equipment Technicians

6,491

8,268

1,777

27%

Market Research Analysts and Marketing
Specialists

1,818

2,308

490

27%

Laborers and Freight, Stock, and Material Movers, Hand

6,491

8,212

1,721

27%

Public Address System and Other Announcers

2,040

2,530

490

24%

Secretaries and Administrative Assistants,
Except Legal, Medical, and Executive

5,193

6,417

1,224

24%

Agents and Business Managers of Artists,
Performers, and Athletes

9,493

11,641

2,148

23%

Radio and Television Announcers

1,174

1,428

254

22%

Producers and Directors

2,881

3,490

609

21%

Bartenders

2,879

3,476

597

21%

Ushers, Lobby Attendants, and Ticket Takers

25,441

30,388

4,947

19%

Accountants and Auditors

1,952

2,314

362

19%

Janitors and Cleaners, Except Maids and
Housekeeping Cleaners

7,299

8,574

1,275

17%

Public Relations Specialists

3,301

3,875

574

17%

Maintenance and Repair Workers, General

3,565

4,160

595

17%

Security Guards

13,975

16,253

2,278

16%

Office Clerks, General

6,068

7,054

986

16%

General and Operations Managers

5,611

6,476

865

15%

Amusement and Recreation Attendants

5,336

6,110

774

15%

Coaches and Scouts

7,769

8,349

580

7%

Athletes and Sports Competitors

9,535

9,775

240

3%

 

"Sports is a major part of our culture and a key economic driver in cities nationwide," said Matt Ferguson, CEO of CareerBuilder and co-author of The Talent Equation. "The growth in sports-related jobs since 2010 is notably higher than that of the national average for all jobs, indicating a greater investment in one of America's favorite pastimes."

Local Sports-Related Job Growth
With football season fast-approaching, CareerBuilder and EMSI focused on markets with national football teams to exemplify how sports-related jobs have impacted local economies. The following is a breakdown of cities with national football teams that experienced the highest growth in all sports-related jobs from 2010 to 2014. In addition, the analysis uses an input-output economic model to determine how the addition of jobs in Sports Teams and Clubs could potentially influence job creation in other industries. 

Pittsburgh, PA

  • 2014 sports jobs– 5,660
  • Sports job growth since 2010 – 56 percent
  • Job growth in all industries since 2010 – 2 percent
  • Jobs that would be added in non-sports-related industries as a result of 100 new jobs being created in Sports Teams and Clubs – 422

Jacksonville, FL

  • 2014 Sports Jobs – 2,872
  • Sport Job Growth – 38 percent
  • Change in Overall Jobs – 8 percent
  • Jobs that would be added in non-sports-related industries as a result of 100 new jobs being created in Sports Teams and Clubs – 444

Atlanta, GA

  • 2014 Sports Jobs – 7,363
  • Sport Job Growth – 29 percent
  • Change in Overall Jobs – 8 percent
  • Jobs that would be added in non-sports-related industries as a result of 100 new jobs being created in Sports Teams and Clubs – 187

Buffalo, NY

  • 2014 Sports Jobs – 2,079
  • Sport Job Growth – 26 percent
  • Change in Overall Jobs – 2 percent
  • Jobs that would be added in non-sports-related industries as a result of 100 new jobs being created in Sports Teams and Clubs – 552

Boston, MA

  • 2014 Sports Jobs – 7,163
  • Sport Job Growth – 22 percent
  • Change in Overall Jobs – 6 percent
  • Jobs that would be added in non-sports-related industries as a result of 100 new jobs being created in Sports Teams and Clubs – 504

Cincinnati, OH

  • 2014 Sports Jobs – 3,196
  • Sport Job Growth – 22 percent
  • Change in Overall Jobs – 4 percent
  • Jobs that would be added in non-sports-related industries as a result of 100 new jobs being created in Sports Teams and Clubs – 539

Denver, CO

  • 2014 Sports Jobs – 4,033
  • Sport Job Growth – 22 percent
  • Change in Overall Jobs – 10 percent
  • Jobs that would be added in non-sports-related industries as a result of 100 new jobs being created in Sports Teams and Clubs – 561

Miami, FL

  • 2014 Sports Jobs – 13,863
  • Sport Job Growth – 21 percent
  • Change in Overall Jobs – 9 percent
  • Jobs that would be added in non-sports-related industries as a result of 100 new jobs being created in Sports Teams and Clubs – 552

Dallas, TX

  • 2014 Sports Jobs – 10,956
  • Sport Job Growth – 19 percent
  • Change in Overall Jobs – 10 percent
  • Jobs that would be added in non-sports-related industries as a result of 100 new jobs being created in Sports Teams and Clubs – 434

Philadelphia, PA

  • 2014 Sports Jobs – 7,622
  • Change in Sports Jobs – 18 percent
  • Change in Overall Jobs – 2 percent
  • Jobs that would be added in non-sports-related industries as a result of 100 new jobs being created in Sports Teams and Clubs – 343

1 - The Bureau of Labor Statistics includes some non-sports-related jobs in certain industries, but sports-related jobs constitute the majority of the employment.

2 - Other Spectator Sports (NAICS 711219) – This U.S. industry comprises (1) independent athletes, such as professional or semiprofessional golfers, boxers, and race car drivers, primarily engaged in participating in live sporting or racing events before a paying audience; (2) owners of racing participants, such as cars, dogs, and horses, primarily engaged in entering them in racing events or other spectator events; and (3) establishments, such as sports trainers, primarily engaged in providing specialized services required to support participants in sports events or competitions.

About EMSI
Economic Modeling Specialists Intl., a CareerBuilder company, turns labor market data into useful information that helps organizations understand the connection between economies, people, and work. Using sound economic principles and good data, EMSI builds user-friendly services that help educational institutions, workforce planners, and regional developers build a better workforce and improve the economic conditions in their regions. For more information, visit www.economicmodeling.com.

About CareerBuilder®
CareerBuilder is the global leader in human capital solutions, helping companies target and attract great talent. Its online career site, CareerBuilder.com®, is the largest in the United States with more than 24 million unique visitors and 1 million jobs. CareerBuilder works with the world's top employers, providing everything from labor market intelligence to talent management software and other recruitment solutions.  Owned by Gannett Co., Inc. (NYSE:GCI), Tribune Company and The McClatchy Company (NYSE:MNI), CareerBuilder and its subsidiaries operate in the United States, Europe, South America, Canada and Asia. For more information, visit www.careerbuilder.com.

Media Contact
Jennifer Grasz  
773-527-1164
[email protected]
http://www.twitter.com/CareerBuilderPR

SOURCE CareerBuilder

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