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Construction in Mexico - Key Trends and Opportunities to 2018

LONDON, Sept. 1, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Reportbuyer.com has added a new market research report:

Construction in Mexico – Key Trends and Opportunities to 2018

https://www.reportbuyer.com/product/1634377/Construction-in-Mexico-–-Key-Trends-and-Opportunities-to-2018.html

Synopsis
This report provides detailed market analysis, information and insights into the Mexican construction industry including:
- Mexican construction industry's growth prospects by market, project type and type of construction activity
- Analysis of equipment, material and service costs across each project type in Mexico
- Critical insight into the impact of industry trends and issues, and the risks and opportunities they present to participants in the Mexican construction industry
- Profiles of the leading operators in Mexican construction industry.
- Data highlights of the largest construction projects in Mexico

Summary
The Mexican construction industry registered a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 4.64% during the review period (2009?2013). Growth was largely driven by a change in Public Works Law, new industry and economic policies, and a National Infrastructure Plan (NIP). The industry is anticipated to expand at a CAGR of 4.84% over the forecast period (2014?2018), driven by growth in the infrastructure market in line with government measures to enhance transport infrastructure. Industry expansion will also be driven by an increase in population, government initiatives to support the growth of high value-add industries, and an expected revival in consumer confidence.

Scope
This report provides a comprehensive analysis of the construction industry in Mexico. It provides:
- Historical (2009-2013) and forecast (2014-2018) valuations of the construction industry in Mexico using construction output and value-add methods
- Segmentation by sector (commercial, industrial, infrastructure, institutional and residential) and by project type
- Breakdown of values within each project type, by type of activity (new construction, repair and maintenance, refurbishment and demolition) and by type of cost (materials, equipment and services)
- Analysis of key construction industry issues, including regulation, cost management, funding and pricing
- Detailed profiles of the leading construction companies in Mexico

Reasons To Buy
- Identify and evaluate market opportunities using our standardized valuation and forecasting methodologies
- Assess market growth potential at a micro-level with over 600 time-series data forecasts
- Understand the latest industry and market trends
- Formulate and validate business strategies using Timetric's critical and actionable insight
- Assess business risks, including cost, regulatory and competitive pressures
- Evaluate competitive risk and success factors

Key Highlights
- After recovering from the financial crisis, the Mexican construction industry recorded a slowdown of 1.8% in 2013. During the review period, the gross value-added growth in construction peaked at an annual rate of 10.6% (in nominal terms) in 2011, but activity slowed in 2013, and a contraction of 1.7% was registered in 2013. The outlook is different for 2014 as the industry is anticipated to register a value-added growth of 3.9% (in nominal terms) generating 300,000 jobs. The industry is set to grow further, both in 2014 and over the forecast period, due to improved economic conditions, low interest rates and increased investment. With government commitment and investment picking up, the industry is showing signs of positive growth. The industry's value add is projected to reach MXN1.5 trillion (US$94.8 billion) in 2018, representative of a forecast-period CAGR of 3.24%.

- Under Mexico's NIP 2014?2018, a series of infrastructure projects will be launched to improve bridges, ports, roads, highways, airports, railways and power supplies, which will ultimately lead to the modernization of the country's infrastructure. Public-private partnerships (PPPs) will be a major source of investment. Mexico's National Infrastructure Fund (Fondo Nacional de Infraestructura) and the National Bank of Public Works and Services (Banco Nacional de Obras y Servicios Públicos) will also act as financial providers to the plan. The government intends to spend MXN7.8 trillion (US$619.1 billion), of which MXN1.3 trillion (US$102.1 billion) is expected to be spent on transport and communication. According to the Secretariat of Communications and Transport (SCT), investment in roads under the plan is 36.0%, higher than the investment made under the previous government.

- In a bid to support the residential construction market and develop affordable properties for low-income demographics, a co-operation agreement was signed between the International Finance Corporation (IFC), a member of the World Bank Group and the Mexican homebuilder Urbi Desarrollos Urbanos in 2012. In partnership with this agreement, financial assistance of up to MXN1.4 billion (US$105.0 million) will be granted to build energy-efficient housing units for low income demographics. Under this agreement, nearly 36,000 housing units must be constructed annually until 2017, to overcome a housing deficit of 9 million units. This will generate 4,500 jobs every year. The IFC will be providing assistance in the form of MXN658.8 million (US$50.0 million) to Urbi, while Canada will make a contribution of MXN263.5 million (US$20.0 million) through the IFC-Canada Climate Change Program. In addition, an amount of MXN461.1 million (US$35.0 million) will also be provided through a syndicated loan from international commercial banks. Consequently, government-led affordable housing projects are expected to encourage expansion in the category over the forecast period.

- To increase the annual inflow of tourists, it is important that the Mexican government makes efforts to ensure safety. According to the World Economic Forum's Travel and Tourism Competitiveness Index 2013, Mexico ranked 121st position out of 140 countries in terms of safety and security. The drug war and associated violence, kidnappings and mass murders have adversely affected the country's image as a safe destination. The growth in tourism can be attributed only to the country's improving economic conditions and a rise in industrial activity, which improved employment opportunities, and led to a rise in income and expenditure. This will further support the growth of the leisure and hospitality buildings category over the forecast period.
Table of Contents
1 Executive Summary
2 Market Overview
2.1 Key Trends and Issues
2.2 Benchmarking by Market Size and Growth
3 Commercial Construction
3.1 Performance Outlook
3.2 Key Trends and Issues
3.3 Data and Project Highlights
4 Industrial Construction
4.1 Performance Outlook
4.2 Key Trends and Issues
4.3 Data and Project Highlights
5 Infrastructure Construction
5.1 Performance Outlook
5.2 Key Trends and Issues
5.3 Data and Project Highlights
6 Institutional Construction
6.1 Performance Outlook
6.2 Key Trends and Issues
6.3 Data and Project Highlights
7 Residential Construction
7.1 Performance Outlook
7.2 Key Trends and Issues
7.3 Data and Project Highlights
8 Company Profile: Empresas ICA, S.A.B. de C.V.
8.1 Empresas ICA, S.A.B. de C.V. – Company Overview
8.2 Empresas ICA, S.A.B. de C.V. – Business Description
8.3 Empresas ICA, S.A.B. de C.V. – Main Services
8.4 Empresas ICA, S.A.B. de C.V. – History
8.5 Empresas ICA, S.A.B. de C.V. – Company Information
8.5.1 Empresas ICA, S.A.B. de C.V. – key competitors
8.5.2 Empresas ICA, S.A.B. de C.V. – key employees
9 Company Profile: Desarrolladora Homex, S.A.B. De C.V.
9.1 Desarrolladora Homex, S.A.B. de C.V. – Company Overview
9.2 Desarrolladora Homex, S.A.B. de C.V. – Business Description
9.3 Desarrolladora Homex, S.A.B. de C.V. – Main Services
9.4 Desarrolladora Homex, S.A.B. de C.V. – History
9.5 Desarrolladora Homex, S.A.B. de C.V. – Company Information
9.5.1 Desarrolladora Homex, S.A.B. de C.V. – key competitors
9.5.2 Desarrolladora Homex, S.A.B. de C.V. – key employees
10 Company Profile: Impulsora del Desarrollo y el Empleo en America Latina S.A.B. de C.V.
10.1 Impulsora del Desarrollo y el Empleo en America Latina S.A.B. de C.V. – Company Overview
10.2 Impulsora del Desarrollo y el Empleo en America Latina S.A.B. de C.V. – Main Services
10.3 Impulsora del Desarrollo y el Empleo en America Latina S.A.B. de C.V. – Company Information
10.3.1 Impulsora del Desarrollo y el Empleo en America Latina S.A.B. de C.V. – key competitors
10.3.2 Impulsora del Desarrollo y el Empleo en America Latina S.A.B. de C.V. – key employees
11 Company Profile: Grupo Carso, S.A. de C.V.
11.1 Grupo Carso, S.A. de C.V. – Company Overview
11.2 Grupo Carso, S.A. de C.V. – Business Description
11.3 Grupo Carso, S.A. de C.V. – Main Products and Services
11.4 Grupo Carso, S.A. de C.V. – History
11.5 Grupo Carso, S.A. de C.V. – Company Information
11.5.1 Grupo Carso, S.A. de C.V. – Key competitors
11.5.2 Grupo Carso, S.A. de C.V. – Key employees
12 Company Profile: Consorcio ARA, S.A.B. de C.V.
12.1 Consorcio ARA, S.A.B. de C.V. – Company Overview
12.2 Consorcio ARA, S.A.B. de C.V. – Business Description
12.3 Consorcio ARA, S.A.B. de C.V. – Main Products and Services
12.4 Consorcio ARA, S.A.B. de C.V. – History
12.5 Consorcio ARA, S.A.B. de C.V. – Company Information
12.5.1 Consorcio ARA, S.A.B. de C.V. – key competitors
12.5.2 Consorcio ARA, S.A.B. de C.V. – key employees
13 Market Data Analysis
13.1 Construction Output and Value Add
13.1.1 Construction output by project type
13.1.2 Construction output by cost type
13.1.3 Construction output by activity type
13.1.4 Construction value add by project type
13.2 Commercial Construction
13.2.1 Commercial construction output by project type
13.2.2 Commercial construction output by cost type
13.2.3 Commercial construction output by activity type
13.2.4 Commercial construction value add by project type
13.3 Industrial Construction
13.3.1 Industrial construction output by project type
13.3.2 Industrial construction output by cost type
13.3.3 Industrial construction output by activity type
13.3.4 Industrial construction value add by project type
13.4 Infrastructure Construction
13.4.1 Infrastructure construction output by project type
13.4.2 Infrastructure construction output by cost type
13.4.3 Infrastructure construction output by activity type
13.4.4 Infrastructure construction value add by project type
13.5 Institutional Construction
13.5.1 Institutional construction output by project type
13.5.2 Institutional construction output by cost type
13.5.3 Institutional construction output by activity type
13.5.4 Institutional construction value add by project type
13.6 Residential Construction
13.6.1 Residential construction output by project type
13.6.2 Residential construction output by cost type
13.6.3 Residential construction output by activity type
13.6.4 Residential construction value add by project type
14 Appendix
14.1 What is this Report About?
14.2 Definitions
14.3 Summary Methodology
14.4 Methodology
14.5 Contact Timetric
14.6 About Timetric
14.7 Timetric's Services
14.8 Disclaimer

List of Tables

Table 1: Benchmarking with Other Major Construction Industries
Table 2: Commercial Construction Project 1 – BBVA – Bancomer Office Tower – Mexico
Table 3: Commercial Construction Project 2 – Sunwing – Puerto Morelos Royalton Riviera Cancun – Quintana Roo
Table 4: Commercial Construction Project 3 – STG – Hotel Royalton Riviera Cancun – Quintana Roo
Table 5: Industrial Construction Project 1 – Audi – San Jose Chiapa Car Manufacturing Plant – Puebla
Table 6: Industrial Construction Project 2 – KIA – Monterrey Car Manufacturing Plant – Mexico
Table 7: Industrial Construction Project 3 – Sener – Topolobampo Nitrogen Fertilizer Production Plant – Sinaloa
Table 8: Infrastructure Construction Project 1 – ASUR – Cancun–Tulum Light Train Development – Quintana Roo
Table 9: Infrastructure Construction Project 2 – SICA/Parlacen – Chiapas-Panama City Railway Facilities – Mexico
Table 10: Infrastructure Construction Project 3 – SCT – Toluca–Mexico City Rail System – Estado de Mexico
Table 11: Institutional Construction Project 1 – SSSLP – Hospital Central Development – San Luis Potosi
Table 12: Institutional Construction Project 2 – IMSS – Garcia Regional Hospital – Nuevo Leon
Table 13: Institutional Construction Project 3 – IMSS – El Marques General Hospital – Queretaro
Table 14: Residential Construction Project 1 – ARA/HU – Cancun Nuevo Mayab Residential Complex – Quintana Roo
Table 15: Residential Construction Project 2 – Urbi – Hacienda Lomas Residential Development – Estado de Mexcio
Table 16: Residential Construction Project 3 – GNL – Police City Housing Development – Nuevo Leon
Table 17: Empresas ICA, S.A.B. de C.V., Key Facts
Table 18: Empresas ICA, S.A.B. de C.V., Main Services
Table 19: Empresas ICA, S.A.B. de C.V., History
Table 20: Empresas ICA, S.A.B. de C.V., Key Employees
Table 21: Desarrolladora Homex, S.A.B. de C.V., Key Facts
Table 22: Desarrolladora Homex, S.A.B. de C.V., Main Services
Table 23: Desarrolladora Homex, S.A.B. de C.V., History
Table 24: Desarrolladora Homex, S.A.B. de C.V., Key Employees
Table 25: Impulsora del Desarrollo y el Empleo en America Latina S.A.B. de C.V., Key Facts
Table 26: Impulsora del Desarrollo y el Empleo en America Latina S.A.B. de C.V., Main Services
Table 27: Impulsora del Desarrollo y el Empleo en America Latina S.A.B. de C.V., Key Employees
Table 28: Grupo Carso, S.A. de C.V., Key Facts
Table 29: Grupo Carso, S.A. de C.V., Main Products and Services
Table 30: Grupo Carso, S.A. de C.V., History
Table 31: Grupo Carso, S.A. de C.V., Key Employees
Table 32: Consorcio ARA, S.A.B. de C.V., Key Facts
Table 33: Consorcio ARA, S.A.B. de C.V., Main Products and Services
Table 34: Consorcio ARA, S.A.B. de C.V., History
Table 35: Consorcio ARA, S.A.B. de C.V., Key Employees
Table 36: Mexican Construction Output by Project Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 37: Mexican Construction Output by Project Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 38: Mexican Construction Output by Cost Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 39: Mexican Construction Output by Cost Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 40: Mexican Construction Output by Activity Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 41: Mexican Construction Output by Activity Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 42: Mexican Construction Value Add by Project Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 43: Mexican Construction Value Add by Project Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 44: Mexican Commercial Construction Output by Project Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 45: Mexican Commercial Construction Output by Project Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 46: Mexican Commercial Construction Output by Cost Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 47: Mexican Commercial Construction Output by Cost Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 48: Mexican Commercial Construction Output by Activity Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 49: Mexican Commercial Construction Output by Activity Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 50: Mexican Commercial Construction Value Add by Project Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 51: Mexican Commercial Construction Value Add by Project Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 52: Mexican Industrial Construction Output by Project Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 53: Mexican Industrial Construction Output by Project Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 54: Mexican Industrial Construction Output by Cost Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 55: Mexican Industrial Construction Output by Cost Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 56: Mexican Industrial Construction Output by Activity Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 57: Mexican Industrial Construction Output by Activity Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 58: Mexican Industrial Construction Value Add by Project Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 59: Mexican Industrial Construction Value Add by Project Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 60: Mexican Infrastructure Construction Output by Project Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 61: Mexican Infrastructure Construction Output by Project Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 62: Mexican Infrastructure Construction Output by Cost Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 63: Mexican Infrastructure Construction Output by Cost Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 64: Mexican Infrastructure Construction Output by Activity Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 65: Mexican Infrastructure Construction Output by Activity Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 66: Mexican Infrastructure Construction Value Add by Project Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 67: Mexican Infrastructure Construction Value Add by Project Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 68: Mexican Institutional Construction Output by Project Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 69: Mexican Institutional Construction Output by Project Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 70: Mexican Institutional Construction Output by Cost Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 71: Mexican Institutional Construction Output by Cost Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 72: Mexican Institutional Construction Output by Activity Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 73: Mexican Institutional Construction Output by Activity Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 74: Mexican Institutional Construction Value Add by Project Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 75: Mexican Institutional Construction Value Add by Project Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 76: Mexican Residential Construction Output by Project Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 77: Mexican Residential Construction Output by Project Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 78: Mexican Residential Construction Output by Cost Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 79: Mexican Residential Construction Output by Cost Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 80: Mexican Residential Construction Output by Activity Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 81: Mexican Residential Construction Output by Activity Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 82: Mexican Residential Construction Value Add by Project Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 83: Mexican Residential Construction Value Add by Project Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 84: Timetric Construction Market Definitions

Table 1: Benchmarking with Other Major Construction Industries
Table 2: Commercial Construction Project 1 – BBVA – Bancomer Office Tower – Mexico
Table 3: Commercial Construction Project 2 – Sunwing – Puerto Morelos Royalton Riviera Cancun – Quintana Roo
Table 4: Commercial Construction Project 3 – STG – Hotel Royalton Riviera Cancun – Quintana Roo
Table 5: Industrial Construction Project 1 – Audi – San Jose Chiapa Car Manufacturing Plant – Puebla
Table 6: Industrial Construction Project 2 – KIA – Monterrey Car Manufacturing Plant – Mexico
Table 7: Industrial Construction Project 3 – Sener – Topolobampo Nitrogen Fertilizer Production Plant – Sinaloa
Table 8: Infrastructure Construction Project 1 – ASUR – Cancun–Tulum Light Train Development – Quintana Roo
Table 9: Infrastructure Construction Project 2 – SICA/Parlacen – Chiapas-Panama City Railway Facilities – Mexico
Table 10: Infrastructure Construction Project 3 – SCT – Toluca–Mexico City Rail System – Estado de Mexico
Table 11: Institutional Construction Project 1 – SSSLP – Hospital Central Development – San Luis Potosi
Table 12: Institutional Construction Project 2 – IMSS – Garcia Regional Hospital – Nuevo Leon
Table 13: Institutional Construction Project 3 – IMSS – El Marques General Hospital – Queretaro
Table 14: Residential Construction Project 1 – ARA/HU – Cancun Nuevo Mayab Residential Complex – Quintana Roo
Table 15: Residential Construction Project 2 – Urbi – Hacienda Lomas Residential Development – Estado de Mexcio
Table 16: Residential Construction Project 3 – GNL – Police City Housing Development – Nuevo Leon
Table 17: Empresas ICA, S.A.B. de C.V., Key Facts
Table 18: Empresas ICA, S.A.B. de C.V., Main Services
Table 19: Empresas ICA, S.A.B. de C.V., History
Table 20: Empresas ICA, S.A.B. de C.V., Key Employees
Table 21: Desarrolladora Homex, S.A.B. de C.V., Key Facts
Table 22: Desarrolladora Homex, S.A.B. de C.V., Main Services
Table 23: Desarrolladora Homex, S.A.B. de C.V., History
Table 24: Desarrolladora Homex, S.A.B. de C.V., Key Employees
Table 25: Impulsora del Desarrollo y el Empleo en America Latina S.A.B. de C.V., Key Facts
Table 26: Impulsora del Desarrollo y el Empleo en America Latina S.A.B. de C.V., Main Services
Table 27: Impulsora del Desarrollo y el Empleo en America Latina S.A.B. de C.V., Key Employees
Table 28: Grupo Carso, S.A. de C.V., Key Facts
Table 29: Grupo Carso, S.A. de C.V., Main Products and Services
Table 30: Grupo Carso, S.A. de C.V., History
Table 31: Grupo Carso, S.A. de C.V., Key Employees
Table 32: Consorcio ARA, S.A.B. de C.V., Key Facts
Table 33: Consorcio ARA, S.A.B. de C.V., Main Products and Services
Table 34: Consorcio ARA, S.A.B. de C.V., History
Table 35: Consorcio ARA, S.A.B. de C.V., Key Employees
Table 36: Mexican Construction Output by Project Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 37: Mexican Construction Output by Project Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 38: Mexican Construction Output by Cost Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 39: Mexican Construction Output by Cost Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 40: Mexican Construction Output by Activity Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 41: Mexican Construction Output by Activity Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 42: Mexican Construction Value Add by Project Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 43: Mexican Construction Value Add by Project Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 44: Mexican Commercial Construction Output by Project Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 45: Mexican Commercial Construction Output by Project Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 46: Mexican Commercial Construction Output by Cost Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 47: Mexican Commercial Construction Output by Cost Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 48: Mexican Commercial Construction Output by Activity Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 49: Mexican Commercial Construction Output by Activity Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 50: Mexican Commercial Construction Value Add by Project Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 51: Mexican Commercial Construction Value Add by Project Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 52: Mexican Industrial Construction Output by Project Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 53: Mexican Industrial Construction Output by Project Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 54: Mexican Industrial Construction Output by Cost Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 55: Mexican Industrial Construction Output by Cost Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 56: Mexican Industrial Construction Output by Activity Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 57: Mexican Industrial Construction Output by Activity Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 58: Mexican Industrial Construction Value Add by Project Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 59: Mexican Industrial Construction Value Add by Project Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 60: Mexican Infrastructure Construction Output by Project Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 61: Mexican Infrastructure Construction Output by Project Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 62: Mexican Infrastructure Construction Output by Cost Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 63: Mexican Infrastructure Construction Output by Cost Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 64: Mexican Infrastructure Construction Output by Activity Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 65: Mexican Infrastructure Construction Output by Activity Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 66: Mexican Infrastructure Construction Value Add by Project Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 67: Mexican Infrastructure Construction Value Add by Project Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 68: Mexican Institutional Construction Output by Project Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 69: Mexican Institutional Construction Output by Project Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 70: Mexican Institutional Construction Output by Cost Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 71: Mexican Institutional Construction Output by Cost Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 72: Mexican Institutional Construction Output by Activity Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 73: Mexican Institutional Construction Output by Activity Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 74: Mexican Institutional Construction Value Add by Project Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 75: Mexican Institutional Construction Value Add by Project Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 76: Mexican Residential Construction Output by Project Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 77: Mexican Residential Construction Output by Project Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 78: Mexican Residential Construction Output by Cost Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 79: Mexican Residential Construction Output by Cost Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 80: Mexican Residential Construction Output by Activity Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 81: Mexican Residential Construction Output by Activity Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 82: Mexican Residential Construction Value Add by Project Type (MXN Million), 2009–2013
Table 83: Mexican Residential Construction Value Add by Project Type (MXN Million), 2013–2018
Table 84: Timetric Construction Market Definitions

List of Figures
Figure 1: Growth Matrix for Construction Output in Mexico (%), 2009–2018
Figure 2: Benchmarking with Other Major Construction Industries (%), 2009–2018
Figure 3: Mexican Commercial Construction Output (US$ Million), 2009–2018
Figure 4: Mexican Industrial Construction Output (US$ Million), 2009–2018
Figure 5: Mexican Infrastructure Construction Output (US$ Million), 2009–2018
Figure 6: Mexican Institutional Construction Output (US$ Million), 2009–2018
Figure 7: Mexican Residential Construction Output (US$ Million), 2009–2018
Figure 8: Mexican Construction Output by Project Type (MXN Million), 2009–2018
Figure 9: Mexican Construction Output by Cost Type (MXN Million), 2009–2018
Figure 10: Mexican Construction Output by Activity Type (MXN Million), 2009–2018
Figure 11: Mexican Construction Value Add by Project Type (MXN Million), 2009–2018
Figure 12: Mexican Commercial Construction Output by Project Type (MXN Million), 2009–2018
Figure 13: Mexican Commercial Construction Output by Cost Type (MXN Million), 2009–2018
Figure 14: Mexican Commercial Construction Output by Activity Type (MXN Million), 2009–2018
Figure 15: Mexican Commercial Construction Value Add by Project Type (MXN Million), 2009–2018
Figure 16: Mexican Industrial Construction Output by Project Type (MXN Million), 2009–2018
Figure 17: Mexican Industrial Construction Output by Cost Type (MXN Million), 2009–2018
Figure 18: Mexican Industrial Construction Output by Activity Type (MXN Million), 2009–2018
Figure 19: Mexican Industrial Construction Value Add by Project Type (MXN Million), 2009–2018
Figure 20: Mexican Infrastructure Construction Output by Project Type (MXN Million), 2009–2018
Figure 21: Mexican Infrastructure Construction Output by Cost Type (MXN Million), 2009–2018
Figure 22: Mexican Infrastructure Construction Output by Activity Type (MXN Million), 2009–2018
Figure 23: Mexican Infrastructure Construction Value Add by Project Type (MXN Million), 2009–2018
Figure 24: Mexican Institutional Construction Output by Project Type (MXN Million), 2009–2018
Figure 25: Mexican Institutional Construction Output by Cost Type (MXN Million), 2009–2018
Figure 26: Mexican Institutional Construction Output by Activity Type (MXN Million), 2009–2018
Figure 27: Mexican Institutional Construction Value Add by Project Type (MXN Million), 2009–2018
Figure 28: Mexican Residential Construction Output by Project Type (MXN Million), 2009–2018
Figure 29: Mexican Residential Construction Output by Cost Type (MXN Million), 2009–2018
Figure 30: Mexican Residential Construction Output by Activity Type (MXN Million), 2009–2018
Figure 31: Mexican Residential Construction Value Add by Project Type (MXN Million), 2009–2018

Read the full report:
Construction in Mexico – Key Trends and Opportunities to 2018

https://www.reportbuyer.com/product/1634377/Construction-in-Mexico-–-Key-Trends-and-Opportunities-to-2018.html

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"We are an all-flash array storage provider but our focus has been on VM-aware storage specifically for virtualized applications," stated Dhiraj Sehgal of Tintri in this SYS-CON.tv interview at 19th Cloud Expo, held November 1-3, 2016, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA.
Fact is, enterprises have significant legacy voice infrastructure that’s costly to replace with pure IP solutions. How can we bring this analog infrastructure into our shiny new cloud applications? There are proven methods to bind both legacy voice applications and traditional PSTN audio into cloud-based applications and services at a carrier scale. Some of the most successful implementations leverage WebRTC, WebSockets, SIP and other open source technologies. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Da...
The cloud competition for database hosts is fierce. How do you evaluate a cloud provider for your database platform? In his session at 18th Cloud Expo, Chris Presley, a Solutions Architect at Pythian, gave users a checklist of considerations when choosing a provider. Chris Presley is a Solutions Architect at Pythian. He loves order – making him a premier Microsoft SQL Server expert. Not only has he programmed and administered SQL Server, but he has also shared his expertise and passion with b...
"IoT is going to be a huge industry with a lot of value for end users, for industries, for consumers, for manufacturers. How can we use cloud to effectively manage IoT applications," stated Ian Khan, Innovation & Marketing Manager at Solgeniakhela, in this SYS-CON.tv interview at @ThingsExpo, held November 3-5, 2015, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA.
As data explodes in quantity, importance and from new sources, the need for managing and protecting data residing across physical, virtual, and cloud environments grow with it. Managing data includes protecting it, indexing and classifying it for true, long-term management, compliance and E-Discovery. Commvault can ensure this with a single pane of glass solution – whether in a private cloud, a Service Provider delivered public cloud or a hybrid cloud environment – across the heterogeneous enter...
Without a clear strategy for cost control and an architecture designed with cloud services in mind, costs and operational performance can quickly get out of control. To avoid multiple architectural redesigns requires extensive thought and planning. Boundary (now part of BMC) launched a new public-facing multi-tenant high resolution monitoring service on Amazon AWS two years ago, facing challenges and learning best practices in the early days of the new service. In his session at 19th Cloud Exp...
The cloud promises new levels of agility and cost-savings for Big Data, data warehousing and analytics. But it’s challenging to understand all the options – from IaaS and PaaS to newer services like HaaS (Hadoop as a Service) and BDaaS (Big Data as a Service). In her session at @BigDataExpo at @ThingsExpo, Hannah Smalltree, a director at Cazena, provided an educational overview of emerging “as-a-service” options for Big Data in the cloud. This is critical background for IT and data professionals...
Today we can collect lots and lots of performance data. We build beautiful dashboards and even have fancy query languages to access and transform the data. Still performance data is a secret language only a couple of people understand. The more business becomes digital the more stakeholders are interested in this data including how it relates to business. Some of these people have never used a monitoring tool before. They have a question on their mind like “How is my application doing” but no id...
@GonzalezCarmen has been ranked the Number One Influencer and @ThingsExpo has been named the Number One Brand in the “M2M 2016: Top 100 Influencers and Brands” by Onalytica. Onalytica analyzed tweets over the last 6 months mentioning the keywords M2M OR “Machine to Machine.” They then identified the top 100 most influential brands and individuals leading the discussion on Twitter.
What happens when the different parts of a vehicle become smarter than the vehicle itself? As we move toward the era of smart everything, hundreds of entities in a vehicle that communicate with each other, the vehicle and external systems create a need for identity orchestration so that all entities work as a conglomerate. Much like an orchestra without a conductor, without the ability to secure, control, and connect the link between a vehicle’s head unit, devices, and systems and to manage the ...
More and more brands have jumped on the IoT bandwagon. We have an excess of wearables – activity trackers, smartwatches, smart glasses and sneakers, and more that track seemingly endless datapoints. However, most consumers have no idea what “IoT” means. Creating more wearables that track data shouldn't be the aim of brands; delivering meaningful, tangible relevance to their users should be. We're in a period in which the IoT pendulum is still swinging. Initially, it swung toward "smart for smar...