Welcome!

Related Topics: @DevOpsSummit, Java IoT, Microservices Expo, @CloudExpo

@DevOpsSummit: Article

SOA or Microservices? | @DevOpsSummit #DevOps #IoT #Docker #Microservices

Some say, microservices is just SOA done right

This is a no-hype, pragmatic post about why I think you should consider architecting your next project the way SOA and/or microservices suggest. No matter if it’s a greenfield approach or if you’re in dire need of refactoring. Please note: considering still keeps open the option of not taking that approach. After reading this, you will have a better idea about whether building multiple small components instead of a single, large component makes sense for your project.

This post assumes that you have experience with software architecture and services (you’ll find some words about my experience on the bottom of this post). I won’t go into the details of Wikipedia’s or Martin Fowler’s definitions per se. Much more I will talk about what microservices and/or SOA could and should do for your project.

Microservices? SOA? Both? None?
I’ll leave it up to you if they are both the same. Some say, microservices is just SOA done right. Some say, microservices has common roots with SOA but is really next-gen and lightweight and less-enterprisey and whatnot.

I don’t stand the slightest chance of resolving this. Therefore, I won’t go with either of them. I’ll go with microsoavices instead. It’s not meant to be funny (in the first place, that is), it’s meant to be a pragmatical phrase that saves me from overhead typing.

The perfect software architecture doesn’t exist
There is no perfect generic software architecture approach but you knew that already. Microsoavices might just not be the perfect fit for your project or even your company. What’s a microsoavice anyway? First and foremost, I’d like to reduce it to two simple key points

  • Fine-grained responsibility
  • Built for fault-tolerance

Those two things are the least common denominator for me on everything you and I already have read about the topic. They should be the basis for any project, no matter if it’s your shiny (shabby?) little garage project or if you’re out for something really big.

Fine-grained responsibility
Microsoavices may be single-task or single domain. Here’s an example for a single-task microsoavice.

Most likely, projects not merely consist of business logic and application domains. There are always some plain utilities involved. I once worked on a project that needed to convert RTF files to HTML. We used a library for that, so it was really easy. On the other hand, updating the library required us to re-deploy all instances of our application. Deployment was automated and we didn’t have to send out floppy-disks with the new versions to our customers but anyway, for a team of three maintaining dozens of instances it required quite some attention.

Wrapping that same library into a stand-alone application that’s listening for incoming HTTP requests was all that was necessary to turn it into a microsoavice (yes, and that final re-deployment of all the instances that changed the internal library call into an external HTTP request). Anyway, from that day on, updating that library was just a matter of re-deploying that single component (as long as the API stayed stable).

Besides single-task microsoavices there’s also more than enough use-cases for covering application domains instead of just single tasks. Take a shopping cart as an example. There are simple functions like

  • Add product to cart
  • Remove product from cart
  • Update product’s quantity in cart

Nobody seriously thinks about creating separate services for those tasks and that’s the reason why it’s as fine-grained as it needs to be (and should be, probably).

Built for fault tolerance
In-process method calls, are replaced with external calls between components. The big difference is that external calls are much more likely to fail. And they will. This requires attention but taking care of it appropriately makes your whole system much more stable and fault-tolerant by design already.

It’s up to you whether you go for a library that handles the issue for you or if you want to take care of it yourself but don’t make the mistake of not taking care. Fault tolerance really is a central issue. Getting it done right early on is the key to succeed with microsoavices.

The problems
Building, deploying and maintaining an ecosystem of many small, independent components poses its own problems. You not only face the problem of fault tolerance, but also the problems of

  • Configuration (where do I reach that service?)
  • Monitoring (what services are available?)
  • Deployment (how many instances are up? on which hosts are they running)
  • Testing (what to do in case of a failing service call?)
  • And quite some more.

Testing and deployment should be taken care of by continuous integration and deployment tools that are available. Monitoring was not there until recently but is already catching up with new products entering the market. Central configuration of a microsoavice environment is probably something that could be solved by using some ESB-like tool.

You see, there seems to be a solution for everything, you might just not be all too happy with them. And I honestly think that we’re not fully there yet when it comes to tooling. The future will bring lots of good tools that make building, deploying and maintaining microsoavices much easier.

The mindset
From my own experience I can say that going down microsoavice lane is not just about all the technical problems. It’s a little bit like the agile thing, which is really also quite a bit about the mindset.

If you are concerned about increased danger of failure because of single failing services, then you probably need to think about it again. If you see how all those small components help you decrease the likeliness of failure, you’re probably settled.

One most important thing not to forget is your developers. Make sure they get the idea of what microsoavices are all about. I will try to cover in a future post, how microsoavices change and improve a developer’s everyday life.

My experience
I have been working as a software developer for about a decade. During that time I worked on all different kinds of projects. I did about 90% web stuff with Java and JavaScript, and also some C#.NET, Visual Basic (pre-dotnet), perl, php, python, etc. I worked several years as a senior lead developer / architect hybrid but also did projects as a one-man-team handling everything from development to deployment and maintainance. Yes, sounds impressive, but, hey, I just did my job.

Looking back, I did some projects which would have really benefitted from doing the microsoavice approach and some others, which surely would have not. And I did one project that was forced into the enteprise-SOA thing in a very dogmatic way, which is why I want to write about the topic pragmatically and from a practical perspective.

Up next
This was just a short introduction to the topic to get your mouth wet. I just touched some keypoints briefly but I will go much more into detail in the posts to follow.

While you’re waiting, why not sharing some of your worst experiences with the topic so far? Tell me about ignorant software architects and blind followers of dogmas, I’m always in for a good laugh.

The post SOA or microservices? (It doesn’t matter a pair of fetid dingo’s kidneys) appeared first on The ruxit blog.

More Stories By Dynatrace Blog

Building a revolutionary approach to software performance monitoring takes an extraordinary team. With decades of combined experience and an impressive history of disruptive innovation, that’s exactly what we ruxit has.

Get to know ruxit, and get to know the future of data analytics.

Latest Stories
Mobile device usage has increased exponentially during the past several years, as consumers rely on handhelds for everything from news and weather to banking and purchases. What can we expect in the next few years? The way in which we interact with our devices will fundamentally change, as businesses leverage Artificial Intelligence. We already see this taking shape as businesses leverage AI for cost savings and customer responsiveness. This trend will continue, as AI is used for more sophistica...
Today most companies are adopting or evaluating container technology - Docker in particular - to speed up application deployment, drive down cost, ease management and make application delivery more flexible overall. As with most new architectures, this dream takes significant work to become a reality. Even when you do get your application componentized enough and packaged properly, there are still challenges for DevOps teams to making the shift to continuous delivery and achieving that reducti...
What is the best strategy for selecting the right offshore company for your business? In his session at 21st Cloud Expo, Alan Winters, U.S. Head of Business Development at MobiDev, will discuss the things to look for - positive and negative - in evaluating your options. He will also discuss how to maximize productivity with your offshore developers. Before you start your search, clearly understand your business needs and how that impacts software choices.
Real IoT production deployments running at scale are collecting sensor data from hundreds / thousands / millions of devices. The goal is to take business-critical actions on the real-time data and find insights from stored datasets. In his session at @ThingsExpo, John Walicki, Watson IoT Developer Advocate at IBM Cloud, will provide a fast-paced developer journey that follows the IoT sensor data from generation, to edge gateway, to edge analytics, to encryption, to the IBM Bluemix cloud, to Wa...
Enterprises are moving to the cloud faster than most of us in security expected. CIOs are going from 0 to 100 in cloud adoption and leaving security teams in the dust. Once cloud is part of an enterprise stack, it’s unclear who has responsibility for the protection of applications, services, and data. When cloud breaches occur, whether active compromise or a publicly accessible database, the blame must fall on both service providers and users. In his session at 21st Cloud Expo, Ben Johnson, C...
Most of the time there is a lot of work involved to move to the cloud, and most of that isn't really related to AWS or Azure or Google Cloud. Before we talk about public cloud vendors and DevOps tools, there are usually several technical and non-technical challenges that are connected to it and that every company needs to solve to move to the cloud. In his session at 21st Cloud Expo, Stefano Bellasio, CEO and founder of Cloud Academy Inc., will discuss what the tools, disciplines, and cultural...
SYS-CON Events announced today that Fusic will exhibit at the Japan External Trade Organization (JETRO) Pavilion at SYS-CON's 21st International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on Oct 31 – Nov 2, 2017, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. Fusic Co. provides mocks as virtual IoT devices. You can customize mocks, and get any amount of data at any time in your test. For more information, visit https://fusic.co.jp/english/.
SYS-CON Events announced today that Massive Networks, that helps your business operate seamlessly with fast, reliable, and secure internet and network solutions, has been named "Exhibitor" of SYS-CON's 21st International Cloud Expo ®, which will take place on Oct 31 - Nov 2, 2017, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. As a premier telecommunications provider, Massive Networks is headquartered out of Louisville, Colorado. With years of experience under their belt, their team of...
21st International Cloud Expo, taking place October 31 - November 2, 2017, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA, will feature technical sessions from a rock star conference faculty and the leading industry players in the world. Cloud computing is now being embraced by a majority of enterprises of all sizes. Yesterday's debate about public vs. private has transformed into the reality of hybrid cloud: a recent survey shows that 74% of enterprises have a hybrid cloud strategy. Me...
SYS-CON Events announced today that Enroute Lab will exhibit at the Japan External Trade Organization (JETRO) Pavilion at SYS-CON's 21st International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on Oct 31 – Nov 2, 2017, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. Enroute Lab is an industrial design, research and development company of unmanned robotic vehicle system. For more information, please visit http://elab.co.jp/.
SYS-CON Events announced today that MIRAI Inc. will exhibit at the Japan External Trade Organization (JETRO) Pavilion at SYS-CON's 21st International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on Oct 31 – Nov 2, 2017, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. MIRAI Inc. are IT consultants from the public sector whose mission is to solve social issues by technology and innovation and to create a meaningful future for people.
With the rise of DevOps, containers are at the brink of becoming a pervasive technology in Enterprise IT to accelerate application delivery for the business. When it comes to adopting containers in the enterprise, security is the highest adoption barrier. Is your organization ready to address the security risks with containers for your DevOps environment? In his session at @DevOpsSummit at 21st Cloud Expo, Chris Van Tuin, Chief Technologist, NA West at Red Hat, will discuss: The top security r...
IBM helps FinTechs and financial services companies build and monetize cognitive-enabled financial services apps quickly and at scale. Hosted on IBM Bluemix, IBM’s platform builds in customer insights, regulatory compliance analytics and security to help reduce development time and testing. In his session at 21st Cloud Expo, Lennart Frantzell, a Developer Advocate with IBM, will discuss how these tools simplify the time-consuming tasks of selection, mapping and data integration, allowing devel...
SYS-CON Events announced today that Mobile Create USA will exhibit at the Japan External Trade Organization (JETRO) Pavilion at SYS-CON's 21st International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on Oct 31 – Nov 2, 2017, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. Mobile Create USA Inc. is an MVNO-based business model that uses portable communication devices and cellular-based infrastructure in the development, sales, operation and mobile communications systems incorporating GPS capabi...
Today traditional IT approaches leverage well-architected compute/networking domains to control what applications can access what data, and how. DevOps includes rapid application development/deployment leveraging concepts like containerization, third-party sourced applications and databases. Such applications need access to production data for its test and iteration cycles. Data Security? That sounds like a roadblock to DevOps vs. protecting the crown jewels to those in IT.